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I am using async/await pattern in .NET 4.5 to implement some service methods in WCF. Example service:

Contract:

[ServiceContract(Namespace = "http://async.test/")]
public interface IAsyncTest
{
    Task DoSomethingAsync();
}

Implementation:

MyAsyncService : IAsyncTest
{
    public async Task DoSomethingAsync()
    {
        var context = OperationContext.Current; // context is present

        await Task.Delay(10);

        context = OperationContext.Current; // context is null
    }
}

The problem I am having is that after first await OperationContext.Current returns null and I can't access OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageHeaders.

In this simple example this is not a problem since I can capture the context before the await. But in the real world case OperationContext.Current is being accessed from deep inside the call stack and I really don't want to change lots of code just to pass the context further.

Is there a way to get operation context after await point without passing it down the stack manually?

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What does it mean to serialize a Task instance over the wire to the client? –  Steven Oct 9 '12 at 10:07
    
When using async/await the Task doesn't get passed to the client. Wcf understands that as void returning method. Client adding a reference to such service would see void DoSomething(); –  mdonatas Oct 9 '12 at 10:30
1  
That's interesting. Still, I'm not sure that you actually want to exeecute operations this way. What do you do when the operation fails for some reason? The client thinks it succeeded succesfully. You'd better queue these operations in a transactional queue of some sort. –  Steven Oct 9 '12 at 11:10
1  
@Steven: The WCF runtime will not return the response to the client until the Task is complete. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 9 '12 at 11:16
    
@StephenCleary: So this is still a synchronous call. When is that actually useful? –  Steven Oct 9 '12 at 11:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think your best option is to actually capture it and pass it manually. You may find this improves the testability of your code.

That said, there are a couple of other options:

  1. Add it to the LogicalCallContext.
  2. Install your own SynchronizationContext which will set OperationContext.Current when it does a Post; this is how ASP.NET preserves its HttpContext.Current.
  3. Install your own TaskScheduler which sets OperationContext.Current.

You may also want to raise this issue on Microsoft Connect.

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+1 for capture+pass for testability :) –  James Manning Oct 9 '12 at 12:41

It is unfortunate that this doesn't work and we will see about getting a fix out in a future release.

In the mean time, there is a way to reapply the context to the current thread so that you don't have to pass the object around:

    public async Task<double> Add(double n1, double n2)
    {

        OperationContext ctx = OperationContext.Current;

        await Task.Delay(100);

        using (new OperationContextScope(ctx))
        {
            DoSomethingElse();
        }
        return n1 + n2;
    }  

In the above example, the DoSomethingElse() method will have access to OperationContext.Current as expected.

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2  
Jon - you clearly know more than most people with a rep of 16 (and I found your blog on MSDN). May I suggest you update your profile so people understand the quality of your answer. –  ErnieL Oct 17 '12 at 13:57
    
Jon, we're just trying to get decide an approach to the subject of this question, I wondered if you could explain why, in your code above, you use OperationContextScope, rather than just using the ctx directly? (I have posted more detail here stackoverflow.com/questions/13290146/…) –  Justin Harvey Nov 9 '12 at 9:54
1  
The primary reason for using OperationContextScope is to get OperationContext.Current set to the one passed to the constructor. This prevents you from having to pass the ctx instance down a deep call stack (e.g. you don't have to modify your method signatures to take an OperationContext parameter). –  JonCole Nov 13 '12 at 17:39
    
This solution does not allow access to OperationContext.Current from within an await. In the above example though, yes, it works. –  Kevin Kalitowski Dec 10 '13 at 20:40

Fortunately for us, our real-life service implementation gets instantiated via Unity IoC container. That allowed us to create a IWcfOperationContext which was configured to have a PerResolveLifetimeManager which simply means that there will be only one instance of WcfOperationContext for each instance of our RealService.
In the constructor of WcfOperationContext we capture OperationContext.Current and then all the places that require it get it from IWcfOperationContext. This is in effect what Stephen Cleary suggested in his answer.

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Here's a sample SynchronizationContext implementation:

public class OperationContextSynchronizationContext : SynchronizationContext
{
    private readonly OperationContext context;

    public OperationContextSynchronizationContext(IClientChannel channel) : this(new OperationContext(channel)) { }

    public OperationContextSynchronizationContext(OperationContext context)
    {
        OperationContext.Current = context;
        this.context = context;
    }

    public override void Post(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
    {
        OperationContext.Current = context;
        d(state);
    }
}

And usage:

var currentSynchronizationContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;
try
{
    SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new OperationContextSynchronizationContext(client.InnerChannel));
    var response = await client.RequestAsync();
    // safe to use OperationContext.Current here
}
finally
{
    SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(currentSynchronizationContext);
}
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Expanding on Mr. Cleary's #1 option, the following code can be placed in the constructor of the WCF service to store and retrieve the OperationContext in the logical call context:

if (CallContext.LogicalGetData("WcfOperationContext") == null)
{
     CallContext.LogicalSetData("WcfOperationContext", OperationContext.Current);
}
else if (OperationContext.Current == null)
{
     OperationContext.Current = (OperationContext)CallContext.LogicalGetData("WcfOperationContext");
}

With that, anywhere you are having issues with a null context you can write something like the following:

var cachedOperationContext = CallContext.LogicalGetData("WcfOperationContext") as OperationContext;
var user = cachedOperationContext != null ? cachedOperationContext.ServiceSecurityContext.WindowsIdentity.Name : "No User Info Available";

Disclaimer: This is year-old code and I don't remember the reason I needed the else if in the constructor, but it was something to do with async and I know it was needed in my case.

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