Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Both python's scipy.stats.ranksums and R's wilcox.test are supposed to calculate two-sided p-values for a Wilcoxon rank sum test. But when I run both functions on the same data, I get p-values that differ by orders of magnitude:

R:

> x=c(57.07168,46.95301,31.86423,38.27486,77.89309,76.78879,33.29809,58.61569,18.26473,62.92256,50.46951,19.14473,22.58552,24.14309)
> y=c(8.319966,2.569211,1.306941,8.450002,1.624244,1.887139,1.376355,2.521150,5.940253,1.458392,3.257468,1.574528,2.338976)
> print(wilcox.test(x, y))

        Wilcoxon rank sum test

data:  x and y 
W = 182, p-value = 9.971e-08
alternative hypothesis: true location shift is not equal to 0 

Python:

>>> x=[57.07168,46.95301,31.86423,38.27486,77.89309,76.78879,33.29809,58.61569,18.26473,62.92256,50.46951,19.14473,22.58552,24.14309]
>>> y=[8.319966,2.569211,1.306941,8.450002,1.624244,1.887139,1.376355,2.521150,5.940253,1.458392,3.257468,1.574528,2.338976]
>>> scipy.stats.ranksums(x, y)
(4.415880433163923, 1.0059968254463979e-05)

So R gives me 1e-7 while Python gives me 1e-5.

Where does this difference come from and which one is the 'correct' p-value?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It depends on the choice of options (exact vs a normal approximation, with or without continuity correction):

R's default:

By default (if ‘exact’ is not specified), an exact p-value is computed if the samples contain less than 50 finite values and there are no ties. Otherwise, a normal approximation is used.

Default (as shown above):

wilcox.test(x, y)

    Wilcoxon rank sum test

data:  x and y 
W = 182, p-value = 9.971e-08
alternative hypothesis: true location shift is not equal to 0 

Normal approximation with continuity correction:

> wilcox.test(x, y, exact=FALSE, correct=TRUE)

    Wilcoxon rank sum test with continuity correction

data:  x and y 
W = 182, p-value = 1.125e-05
alternative hypothesis: true location shift is not equal to 0 

Normal approximation without continuity correction:

> (w0 <- wilcox.test(x, y, exact=FALSE, correct=FALSE))

    Wilcoxon rank sum test

data:  x and y 
W = 182, p-value = 1.006e-05
alternative hypothesis: true location shift is not equal to 0 

For a little more precision:

w0$p.value
[1] 1.005997e-05

It looks like the other value Python is giving you (4.415880433163923) is the Z-score:

2*pnorm(4.415880433163923,lower.tail=FALSE)
[1] 1.005997e-05

I can appreciate wanting to know what's going on, but I would also point out that there is rarely any practical difference between p=1e-7 and p=1e-5 ...

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Scipy returns the z-score here. docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/… –  larsmans Oct 9 '12 at 12:00
    
I believe there may also be differences when handeling ties, which may have to be handled specifically in scipy. –  seberg Oct 9 '12 at 12:28
    
Thank you for the explanation! Do you know if there is any way to force Scipy to calculate an exact p-value and also handle ties? I know there is an alternative function in Scipy called scipy.stats.mannwhitneyu which handles ties and does a continuity correction, but that's still not exact and the docs state that I should have at least 20 samples each for it anyway. –  Nils Oct 9 '12 at 13:10
    
sorry, I don't do Scipy, so I have no idea ... there is a python-to-R interface ( rpy.sourceforge.net/rpy2.html ) in case that's useful ... –  Ben Bolker Oct 9 '12 at 13:12
    
I am trying to stick with Python for performance reasons, but thanks for the link! It looks like their scipy.stats.mannwhitneyu function will be the thing to use, since it seems to be the only option supporting ties. It's apparently not meant for sample sizes < 20, but I guess this would be the same in R, right? –  Nils Oct 9 '12 at 14:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.