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When the value to be shifted (left-operand) is an int, only the last 5 digits of the right-hand operand are used to perform the shift. The actual size of the shift is the value of the right-hand operand masked by 31 (0x1f). Ie the shift distance is always between 0 and 31 (if shift value is > 32 shift is 32 % value)

35             00000000 00000000 00000000 00100011
31 -> 0x1f     00000000 00000000 00000000 00011111
&              -----------------------------------
Shift value    00000000 00000000 00000000 00000011   -> 3

-29            11111111 11111111 11111111 11100011
31 -> 0x1f     00000000 00000000 00000000 00011111
&              -----------------------------------
Shift value    00000000 00000000 00000000 00000011   -> 3

What does that really mean? Does it mean for right shift, the maximum you can multiply is with 32? Is this to prevent overflow?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not that the maximum you can multiply by is 32, it's 2^31. (Bit shifting is exponentiation, not multiplication)

Considering that integers only have 32 bits, what would you expect to happen if you shifted by more then 31 bits anyway? You'd end up with the exact same result regardless of your input value - all of its its bits would have been shifted "off the end" - so it would serve no purpose whatsoever as an operation.

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that makes sense.. thanks –  bsr Oct 9 '12 at 10:24
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It means you can only shift be a value between 0 and 31 as there are 32 bits in an int type. For a long you can only shift by 0 to 63 bits.

If you give it any other value the shifted amount is masked with & 31 or & 63 as appropriate.

e.g. if you want a sign extended lower 7 bits of a number you can use

n << -7 >> -7

This works whether n is an int or long


From JLS 15.19

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is int, only the five lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x1f. The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 31, inclusive.

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is long, then only the six lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x3f. The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 63, inclusive.

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Can you explain why? –  Duncan Oct 9 '12 at 10:22
    
Its in the JLS as above. Why did they put it in the JLS? I don't know as it would be more natural to just call the shift assembly instruction but I assume they wanted a cross platform definition. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 9 '12 at 10:27
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