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I don't understand why Haskell can't figure out the type for line 8 in the following code. Doesn't the type signature of the expressMaybe function establish that the result type is the same as the type of the two input parameters?

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-}

class Gene g n where
  express :: g -> g -> g
  -- there will be other functions that use the "n" type parameter

expressMaybe :: Gene g n => Maybe g -> Maybe g -> Maybe g
expressMaybe (Just a) (Just b) = Just (express a b) -- line 8
expressMaybe (Just a) Nothing  = Just a
expressMaybe Nothing (Just b)  = Just b
expressMaybe Nothing Nothing   = Nothing

The error I get is:

Amy20.hs:8:40:
    Ambiguous type variable `n0' in the constraint:
      (Gene g n0) arising from a use of `express'
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    In the first argument of `Just', namely `(express a b)'
    In the expression: Just (express a b)
    In an equation for `expressMaybe':
        expressMaybe (Just a) (Just b) = Just (express a b)
Failed, modules loaded: none.

I tried playing around with RankNTypes and ScopedTypeVariables, but I couldn't figure out how to make the error go away.

Thank you in advance for your help!

Edit: Now that I understand the problem, I used fundeps, because I'm familiar with them, and for my application it doesn't make much sense to have more than one "alphabet" for encoding genes. I've never used type families before, though, so I'll look into that too.

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses, FunctionalDependencies #-}

class Gene g n | g -> n where
  express :: g -> g -> g
  -- there will be other functions that use the "n" type parameter

expressMaybe :: Gene g n => Maybe g -> Maybe g -> Maybe g
expressMaybe (Just a) (Just b) = Just (express a b) -- line 8
expressMaybe (Just a) Nothing  = Just a
expressMaybe Nothing (Just b)  = Just b
expressMaybe Nothing Nothing   = Nothing
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1  
Can you tell us how you plan on using n? It makes a difference to what the best answer is. –  AndrewC Oct 9 '12 at 11:05
    
n (for nucleotide) is the type used to encode the gene. For example, I might define something like data Nucleotide = A | C | T | G –  mhwombat Oct 9 '12 at 12:06
    
I've learned a bit more about genes; can't you just use the same bases all the time? You could replace all the ns in your code with Nucleotide. Maybe you could even replace your Gene type class with a single Gene type. All your code would get clearer and simpler. –  AndrewC Oct 17 '12 at 14:21
1  
For my own part, I can use the same bases for everything. But I'm developing a framework, and I want my users to be able to use it with their own types. Computer scientists doing evolutionary programming will probably want to use plain old binary encoding, while biologists might want to use ACGT. So I've switched over to using type families. –  mhwombat Oct 17 '12 at 14:56
1  
Actually, I refactored the code so that there is no "n" type parameter for Gene, and the methods that do the encoding and decoding are passed a coding scheme so they know how to convert between genes and nucleotides. But I did end up using type families elsewhere in my framework. –  mhwombat Oct 17 '12 at 15:52
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Consider this:

instance Gene String Int where
  express _ _ = "INT"

instance Gene String Double where
  express _ _ = "DOUBLE"

expressMaybe (Just "") (Just "")

Should that code produce (Just "INT") or (Just "DOUBLE")? Yes, Haskell knows that the result of expressMaybe will have the same type as the arguments. But that doesn't mean it knows which instance to use here since there can be multiple instances for the same type g with different n.

If in your case there will only ever be one type n for each type g, you might consider using extensions like type families or functional dependencies with which you can express that fact to the type system.

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1  
+1 for type families suggestion (much less pain than multi-parameter type classes) –  AndrewC Oct 9 '12 at 11:04
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I suggest you avoid functional dependencies and go for type families. They're more fun and more intuitive:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, KindSignatures #-}

class Gene g where
  type Nucleotide g :: *  -- each instance has an associated type
  express :: g -> g -> g
  encode :: [Nucleotide g] -> g -- probably doesn't make sense, but need an example
  -- there will be other functions that use the "Nucleotide g" type parameter

Let's say we have

data ACTG = A | C | T | G
data ACTGgene = ACTGgene [ACTG]

Essentially, you define the type function by trivial pattern matching at the type level:

instance Gene ACTGgene where
  type Nucleotide ACTGgene = ACTG
  encode ns = ACTGgene ns
  express = error "I'm out of my depth here because I gave up Biology when I hit 14."

Now our code compiles:

expressMaybe :: Gene g => Maybe g -> Maybe g -> Maybe g
expressMaybe (Just a) (Just b) = Just (express a b) -- compiles fine
expressMaybe (Just a) Nothing  = Just a
expressMaybe Nothing (Just b)  = Just b
expressMaybe Nothing Nothing   = Nothing

Now it may be that your Gene types are essentially determined by what Nucleotides you're using, or maybe you can use different nucleotides interchangably, I don't know, but one possible solution to your problems is to use a constructor class instead:

class Gene g where
   express :: g n -> g n -> g n
   encode :: n -> g n
   -- more stuff

This would fit with data declarations like

data ACTG = A | C | T | G
data ListGene n = ListGene [n]

instance Gene ListGene where
  ...

but maybe that's just too parametric for your problem domain, I don't know.


Certainly you should try type families. I did. Now I love them. - linked answer includes links at the end for further reading.

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