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How exactly does dependency injection reduce coupling?

Dependency Injection as a concept, I think, encapsulates loose coupling. Is it correct to say that it helps in achieving Loose Coupling? From what I understand, if you have designed a class with loose coupling, then you can implement DI on it. Please help me understand and correct me if I am wrong.

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marked as duplicate by Don Roby, pap, Raedwald, t0mm13b, McGarnagle Oct 10 '12 at 0:20

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If you look at the right side in your browser you will find a title that says Related. Under that title you will find lots of questions on that subject. Have you looked at any of those before asking this question? –  maba Oct 9 '12 at 11:15
    
yes, of course I looked at the right side. If any of the questions were answering what I was looking for, I would not have wasted my time asking it. Thanks –  Nihal Sharma Oct 9 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would say that loose coupling has inherently nothing to do with DI. You can use DI on a project that has completely tight coupling if you want.

Loose coupling is isolation of one component from the implementation details of another. It is typically achieved in java by providing collaborators as an instance of an interface, rather than a concrete class.

What i would say is that DI tends to lead people toward loosely coupled code in many situations, but it doesn't force them to it (though in some products like spring there are a lot of downsides to not using interfaces). Containers also have support for wiring loosely coupled collaborators as well. This example is perfectly fine in a DI container, while being tightly coupled.

public class FooService { ... }

public class SomeOtherService {
     public SomeOtherService(FooService fooService) {
          this.fooService = fooService;
     }
}

However, this is loosely coupled, since the "SomeOtherService" is tied to the interface.

public interface FooService { ... }

public class SomeOtherService {
     public SomeOtherService(FooService fooService) {
          this.fooService = fooService;
     }
}

Insert your favorite wiring mechanism (guice, spring annotations, spring xml, java cdi), but the concept is the same.

Wikipedia has a good article on loose coupling:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loose_coupling

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perfect !!! Thanks a lot. –  Nihal Sharma Oct 10 '12 at 3:25

As @maba suggested, there is a lot of related materials on this site.

But anyway: Yes, you are right. You can always implement DI on your own, but it is generally too complex task. Because if you would like to keep it simple, you will run into "dependency carrying" problems and many others.

Take a quick look at Guice, Spring, Pico ;-) They are all well tested and fully functional. Good luck.

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Yes, DI helps to achieve loose coupling , because wherever you need object of any component or service, you can just autowire it by type of it's super interface. Depending on type of class you will specify in your application-context file or class which you will annotate with @Component, @Service or @Reposirory, type of actual object injected will be decided on runtime.

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This has nothing to do with loose coupling. What you are talking about is autowiring which works just as well for tightly coupled collaborators as it would for loosely coupled ones. –  Matt Oct 9 '12 at 20:46
    
If I am not wrong, then tight coupling means having dependency on classes, whereas loose coupling means not having dependency on classes. Isn't it? So, DI is helping us in achieving the same. We only specify interface at the compile time and depending upon type specified in config file, object of that type is inserted on runtime. Please correct me if I am wrong. –  Sumit Desai Oct 10 '12 at 4:03

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