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A question spurred by curiosity, if I have the following code, what's the benefit (beyond just the simplicity) of calling a property via this instead of user in the show_name method?

var user = {

    name : 'John Doe',

    show_name : function(){

        alert(this.name);

        // OR

        alert(user.name);
    }
};
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1  
Note that there might be other side-effects using this: user.show_name.call(null); –  David Oct 9 '12 at 12:15
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The difference becomes obvious, if you have a look at this example. It creates a second object and sets the prototype accordingly.

var user = {

    name : 'John Doe',

    show_name : function(){

        alert(this.name);

        // OR

        alert(user.name);
    }
};

user2 = Object.create( user );
user2.name = "someone else";

user2.show_name();

Here this.name refers to the current object's name property, whereas user.name always refers to the original name property.

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By using this you ensure that after changing your variable name e.g. from user to something your code still works.

Other than that, I imagine that (on some browsers) there may be some performance gain too, since with user.name browser has to lookup in context outside your function while using this.name sticks to current context.

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Wow, that's a pretty straight-forward answer. Thanks. –  Fluidbyte Oct 9 '12 at 12:11
    
How does referencing 'this' vs 'user' ensure that we can change 'name' to 'something'. Don't you mean that we can change 'user' to 'something'? –  Jacob T. Nielsen Oct 9 '12 at 12:44
    
@Jacob - good catch - of course I meant to write user not name. –  WTK Oct 9 '12 at 12:51
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You can use the same function in multiple places and have it be context sensitive.

function foo() {
  alert(this.name);
}

var a = { alert: foo, name: "A" };
var b = { alert: foo, name: "B" };
a.alert();
b.alert();
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If you're making multiple copies of an object, you need this so you can reference the current obect. Using the name would reference the default object, not the copy you're working with.

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In JavaScript this always refers to the “owner” of the function we're executing, or rather, to the object that a function is a method of. When we define our faithful function doSomething() in a page, its owner is the page, or rather, the window object (or global object) of JavaScript. An onclick property, though, is owned by the HTML element it belongs to.

The usage of this is more recommended than the function name because of obvious reasons.

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The statement this always refers to the “owner” of the function is incorrect. A function's this value is set entirely by how the function is called (or by bind) and can be set to any object or any value at all in ES5 strict mode. –  RobG Oct 9 '12 at 13:13
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this here specifies that the object is part of the current name space and is accessible inside the object .. lets suppose your object name changes from user to newUser there will not be any dependency and remove any coupling issues..

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Whether you use this or the function name depends on how the function will be called.

A function's this value is set by how the function is called or by bind, so if the function will always be called as a method of a suitable object, use this. But if it might be called any other way, or this should only reference a particular object, either use bind or the object name.

e.g. given the OP example, consider:

var x = user.showName;
x();

In the above, showName is called without setting its this, so it defaults to the global object and this.name within the function will likely no be what is expected.

Changing the function name is not a particularly onerous issue given the availability of reasonably powerful search and replace functionality in text editors.

Incidentally, this question is asked frequently. There is no "correct" answer, only advice on how to make choices in certain cases.

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