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I have two modules with the same method name. When I include both modules in some class, only the method of the last module is executed. I need instead both to be executed when I initialize the class:

class MyClass
    include FirstModule
    include SecondModule

    def initialize
        foo # foo is contained in both modules but only the one in SecondModules is executed
    end
end

Is it doable?

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1  
"Doable?" - Not without some metaprogramming voodoo magic. –  Sergio Tulentsev Oct 9 '12 at 12:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Can you modify the included modules? Perhaps you just call super in the second module?

module M1
  def foo
    p :M1
  end
end

module M2
  def foo
    p :M2
    defined?(super) && super
  end
end

class SC
  include M1
  include M2

  def initialize
    foo
  end
end

SC.new

Or perhaps you actually want to do this?

module M1
  def bar; p :M1 end
end

module M2
  include M1
  def foo; bar; p :M2 end
end

class SC
  include M2
  def initialize; foo end
end

See live demo here

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sure i can modify modules, they are mine, and your solution works great. thanks –  San Tiago Oct 9 '12 at 12:54
1  
A bit fragile, also, strictly speaking, you are answering a sligtly different question that which was asked, but your solution works, vote up for you. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 9 '12 at 12:57
    
@SanTiago: It is not as obvious as you think. And since the modules are yours, are you sure you simply don't want to write module M1; def bar; p :M1 end end; module M2; include M1, def foo; p :M2 end end; class SC; include M1; def initialize; foo end end ? –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 9 '12 at 13:07
    
@BorisStitnicky much better, i like it, not sure what OP thinking about this –  user904990 Oct 9 '12 at 13:20
1  
Please make sure to call super if defined?(super), otherwise you can't include M2 without including M1 before, or defining foo somewhere in a superclass. –  rewritten Oct 9 '12 at 13:22

As Yusuke Endoh might say, everything is doable in Ruby. In this case, you have to forget about convenience of just saying 'foo', and you have to be very explicit about what you actually want to do, like this:

class MyClass
  include FirstModule
  include SecondModule
  def initialize
    FirstModule.instance_method( :foo ).bind( self ).call
    SecondModule.instance_method( :foo ).bind( self ).call
  end
end

The line 'FirstModule.instance_method...' can be replaced by simply saying 'foo', but by being explicit, you ensure that no matter what, you are calling the method from that mixin, from which you think you do.

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Do you need to include those modules? I suppose not. –  sawa Oct 9 '12 at 12:42
2  
Actually, #bind method is quite picky about that and allows you to only bind unbound methods to the objects of the same class. So if you want to bind withoud doing include, you need some additional magic to make it 'doable', such as redefining the #bind method itself ^_^ –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 9 '12 at 12:45
    
So you mean, bind is a protected method? I didn't realize that point. Good to know. –  sawa Oct 9 '12 at 12:50
2  
No, it is a public instance method of the UnboundMethod class. But it raises an error if its argument (the object to which the method is being bound) is not of the same class as the object from which the method was unbound. I think that the purpose of these unbound methods is exactly to make it possible for people to magick with module inheritance, resolve inheritance diamonds etc. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 9 '12 at 12:52
2  
I actually consider this somewhat too strict of a limitation, I think it should be enough if the object to which the method is bound was of the same duck type, but go and persuade Matz to give an official nod to such dangerous stuff by allowing it in the vanilla #bind method ^_^ –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 9 '12 at 12:55

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