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Can some one please tell me why I get odd results rurning the following code?

<?php
class Bank
{
    var $ID;
    var $balance;
    var $name;
    function bank($name,$id,$balance=0)
    {
    	$this->ID=$id;
    	$this->balance=$balance;
    	$this->name=$name;
    }
    function getBalance()
    {
    	return $this->balance;
    }
    function setBalance($bal)
    {
    	$this->balance=$bal;
    }
    function getId()
    {
    	return $this->ID;
    }
    function setId($i)
    {
    	$this->ID=$i;
    }
)
$b= new bank(yaniv,027447002, 15000);

Now when I try to echo:

$b->ID

Instead of the expected 027447002 I get an odd 6180354, but if I initiate the object like this :

$b=new bank(yaniv,'027447002',15000);

(notice I quoted the id property) it works OK. Any suggestion why is this happening and what is the right way to fix it?

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7 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

027447002 is in octal, as it prefixed with a zero. Convert that to decimal and you get 6180354!

See the manual page on integers for details.

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thanks that was helpful –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 20:43
    
amazing...+1 to my knowledge =) –  Gerep Jan 5 '12 at 10:43
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Remove the leading zero, because it makes PHP treat the number as an octal number.

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Because of the initial zero, it is interpreted as an octal number.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.integer.php

If the number should be left padded with zeros when printed (they are always a specific length) then you can use sprintf() to convert the stored integer to a zero padded string.

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thanks that was helpful –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 20:44
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Numeric literals with leading zeroes are how you specify something in octal (base 8). If you write 27447002 instead of 027447002 you'll be fine.

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thanks for the quick meaningful reply –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 20:45
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Automatic base conversion. You don't even need all that class code to see this in action

echo 027447002;

The thing is that 027447002, in terms of numbers, is octal (base-8) - not a zero-filled decimal (base-10) integer.

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I have one comment besides what everyone else is saying.

It appears you want a 0 padded number, right? A nine digit number that's padded with zeros on the left?

Think about using str_pad function. Like so:

...
function bank($name, $id, $bal=0)
{
 ...
 $this->id = str_pad($id, 9, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
 ...
}
...

Then in your function you can call:

$b = new bank('John Doe', 12345678, 1.25);

If you output id, it would be padded

012345678

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thanks so much for that actually i will be getting this number as an input from the user and he'll probably enter the zero so i need to find a way to get that number as a string or something like that... :) –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 21:00
    
Just to tell you, php makes no distinction on strings. Everything is a string, and everything is a number. So if a user enters a "number" on a form, it'll be treated as both a number and string, there will be no need to "convert" other than to ensure that it's a valid input. –  Daniel Aug 14 '09 at 21:11
    
Also, look up the is_ checks. To check for numeric input, try is_numeric. It will tell you if an input is numeric. –  Daniel Aug 14 '09 at 21:13
1  
Finally, your sample code explicitly told php to use octal values (which wasn't your intention). In the original code, if a user enters 012345678 from the _POST/_GET variable on a webpage, it would work AS EXPECTED –  Daniel Aug 14 '09 at 21:20
    
Thanks Daniel :) your help is highly appreciated! Thanks so much for your time –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 22:45
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As everyone rightly said - this is considered an octal value by default. I think the class constructor should be testing that it is a valid integer, and initiating the class should typecast the value...

function bank($name, $id, $balance=0)
{
    if (is_int($id))
      $this->ID=$id;
    else
      throw new Exception('ID is not integer');

    // and validate these too!
    $this->balance=$balance;
    $this->name=$name;
}

$b= new bank('yaniv', (int)027447002, 15000);

Hope that helps!

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thanks it help! :) –  Yaniv Golan Aug 14 '09 at 21:02
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