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because my project wants to start test-driven development I decided to write a small tutorial about Junit 4 (currently JUnit 4.10 with Eclipse Juno) for my project.

Bill.java

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

/**
 * @author funkymonkey
 * 
 *         Class Bill can store an id and a priceList (List<Float>)
 *         - id with setter and getter
 *         - prices can be added to the priceList
 *         - getter for priceList
 *         - total amount of price in priceList can be calculated
 */

public class Bill {
   private Integer     id;       // invoice number (one for every Bill)

   private List<Float> priceList; // list will contain prices of the products

   public Bill() {
      priceList = new ArrayList<Float>();
   }

   public Bill(Integer id) {
      this.id = id;

      priceList = new ArrayList<Float>();
   }

   public Integer getId() {
      return id;
   }

   public void setId(Integer id) {
      this.id = id;
   }

   public List<Float> getPriceList() {
      return priceList;
   }

   public void addPrice(Float price) {
      if (price <= 0) {
         throw new IllegalArgumentException("Value is less or equal zero");
      }

      priceList.add(price);
   }

   public float getTotalPrice() {
      float totalPrice = 0;

      for (Float p : priceList) {
         totalPrice = totalPrice + p;
      }
      return totalPrice;
   }
}

BillTest.java

import static org.junit.Assert.assertArrayEquals;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;
import static org.junit.matchers.JUnitMatchers.hasItems;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

public class BillTest {

   private static Bill       jBill1;
   private static final float FLOAT_1        = (float) 1;
   private static final float FLOAT_20       = (float) 20;
   private static final float FLOAT_3P345    = (float) 3.345;
   private static final float FLOAT_0P000001 = (float) 0.000001;

   @Before
   // initialize objects before running tests
   public void setUp() throws Exception {
      jBill1 = new Bill();
   }

   @After
   // something which should be done after running a single test
   public void tearDown() throws Exception {
   }

   @Test
   // test addPrice()
   public final void testAddPrice_priceIsGreaterThanZero() {
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_1);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_20);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_3P345);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_0P000001);

      // check if expected values == results

      // we are comparing lists so we are using assertEquals(expected, result)
      List<Float> expectedList = new ArrayList<Float>();
      expectedList.add(FLOAT_1);
      expectedList.add(FLOAT_20);
      expectedList.add(FLOAT_3P345);
      expectedList.add(FLOAT_0P000001);
      List<Float> resultList = jBill1.getPriceList();

      assertEquals(expectedList, resultList);

      // we are comparing arrays so we can use assertArrayEquals(expected, result)
      Object[] expectedArray = { FLOAT_1, FLOAT_20, FLOAT_3P345, FLOAT_0P000001 };
      Object[] resultArray = jBill1.getPriceList().toArray();

      assertArrayEquals(expectedArray, resultArray);

      // we are comparing strings to we can use assertEquals(expected, result)
      String expectedString = expectedList.toString();
      String resultString = jBill1.getPriceList().toString();

      assertEquals(expectedString, resultString);

      // let us compare the size of the lists using assertTrue (boolean condition)
      Integer expectedLength = expectedList.size();
      Integer resultLength = jBill1.getPriceList().size();

      assertTrue(expectedLength == resultLength);
      // or use assertTrue(expectedLength.equals(resultLength));

      // you can also use your own matchers by using assertThat(result, matcher)
      assertThat(resultList, hasItems(expectedList.toArray(new Float[expectedList.size()])));
      // or assertThat(resultList, hasItems(FLOAT_1, FLOAT_20, FLOAT_3P345, (float)
      // 0.000001));

   }

   @Test(expected = IllegalArgumentException.class)
   // test will pass if exception is thrown from addPrice()
   public final void testAddPrice_priceIsZero() {
      // this will throw the exception IllegalArgumentException
      jBill1.addPrice((float) 0);
   }

   @Test(expected = IllegalArgumentException.class)
   // test will pass if exception is thrown from addPrice()
   public final void testAddPrice_priceIsLessThanZero() {
      // this will throw the exception IllegalArgumentException
      jBill1.addPrice((float) -1);
   }

   @Test
   // test if calculating works via getTotalPrice()
   public final void testGetTotalPrice() {
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_1);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_20);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_3P345);
      jBill1.addPrice(FLOAT_0P000001);

      Float expectedValue = FLOAT_1 + FLOAT_20 + FLOAT_3P345 + FLOAT_0P000001;
      Float resultValue = jBill1.getTotalPrice();

      // we are comparing float values so we can use assertEquals(expected, result)
      assertEquals(expectedValue, resultValue);
   }
}

My questions are:

  • how to explain an old fashioned coder (waterfall model) how he/she could benefit from JUnit
  • additional package which could be useful (mocking frameworks?)
  • most important methods in JUnit?
  • is the example code useful to explain somebody the functionality of junit?
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by amit, unholysampler, Esko Luontola, Boris Terzic, kleopatra Oct 9 '12 at 14:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I don't see a question in here. Am I missing it? –  amit Oct 9 '12 at 14:00
1  
If you want the code review and no question, you should have moved it to the code review site :D –  sheidaei Oct 9 '12 at 14:03
    
i edited the questions :) –  Funky Monkey Oct 9 '12 at 14:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In general: Don't use magic hardcoded numbers. The better define constants so you can edit them at ONE point:

 public static final float FLOAT_1  =  1;
 public static final float FLOAT_20 = 20;

 public final void testAddPrice_priceIsGreaterThanZero() {
   expectedList.add((float) FLOAT_1);
   expectedList.add((float) FLOAT_20);
   List<Float> expectedList = new ArrayList<Float>();
   expectedList.add((float) FLOAT_1);
   expectedList.add((float) FLOAT_20);
   //...
 }

Unittests like JUnit are designed as "one test for one responsibility". So for your methods #getPriceList() and getPriceList().toString() etc. define all seperated Tests(could do the add in the setUp() because every test should be run independent of other tests). JUnit is fail-fast, that means after the first failed test it will beak the test-method. So you lose all tests after the first failed test, if you ceep them in one test-method.

you could add JavaDoc to your Test-methods, to describe how they test the functionality. Random Example-Values, Expected Exceptions etc.

share|improve this answer
    
I added a constants section. Thank you for your advise –  Funky Monkey Oct 9 '12 at 15:28

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