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Let's assume that we have the following series of URIs:

A: /user/a/b/c

B: /user/a/b/f/d

C: /user/a/b/e

D: /user/a/k/r

I need a regular expression in python that matches all rules except rule B. Thus it should match all URIs starting with /user/a but it should exclude the URIs that end with d.

Thanks a lot in advance!

Update: The segments of the paths are not single characters but whole words. For example d can be "send".

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4 Answers 4

How about something like:

^/user/a/.*[^d]$

reading it as "start with /user/a/, then any number of other characters, and then a final character, which must not be a d.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the the answer of Jiman, the exact solution to my question is the following:

(?!.*d)\/user/a/.*

Notice that d and a correspond to whole words. Thus an example would be:

(?!.*send)\/user/myapp/.*
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Try this out:

(?!.*\/d)\/user\/a.*

(?!.*/d) -> negative look ahead assertion, basically saying it does not end with /d

Teach a man to fish:

http://rubular.com/

Enter the test strings and play around with the regexes :)

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Probably just clearer to use:

a = '/user/a/b/f/d'
b = s.strip('/').split('/')
if b[:2] == ['user', 'a'] and b[-1] != 'd':
    pass # whatever

Or, if you're not splitting by /'s, then:

if a.startswith('/user/a') and not a.endswith('d'):
    pass # whatever
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The second approach is easily readable & meaningful. Given the simple description of the problem, I don't think there are any corner cases to cover, even if segments could be words. Here's a list comprehension version of the same - refheap.com/paste/5621/raw –  Abhishek Mishra Oct 9 '12 at 15:20

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