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I have some class which have some code

public IEnumerable<TypeOne> TypeOne
    {
        get
        {
            if (db != null)
            {
                var col = db.Select<TypeOne>();
                if (col.Count > 0) return col;
            }
            return db2.TypeOne;
        }
    }
    public IEnumerable<TypeTwo> TypeTwo
    {
        get
        {
            if (db != null)
            {
                var col = db.Select<TypeTwo>();
                if (col.Count > 0) return col;
            }
            return db2.TypeTwo;
        }
    }

So as You can see there is a lot of duplicated Code and there are same property name and item type of enumerable. I want to call some property of object like "obj.MyProp". And MyProp must be resolved at runtime with some generic or non-generic method. Is it possible?

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could you elaborate some more? what is obj.MyProp? –  Daniel A. White Oct 9 '12 at 15:21
    
What you need is called reflection. Here's a tutorial: csharp.net-tutorials.com/reflection/introduction –  Simon Germain Oct 9 '12 at 15:21
    
What ORM mapper are you using? –  Steven Oct 9 '12 at 15:21
1  
Most of the above can be dealt with using generics already - the only thing that's not that simple are the calls to db2, though you may be able to refactor those. –  Oded Oct 9 '12 at 15:22
    
This is just sample. Not real code but idea. Calls to db2 we can make using PropertyInfo, but before this i must handle call ty MyProp. –  Dmitry Dashko Oct 9 '12 at 15:22
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3 Answers 3

Slightly incomplete answer but you'll get the general idea:

This is a scenario where you want generics.

public IEnumerable<t> TypeSomething
{
    get
    {
        if (db != null)
        {
            t col = db.Select<t>();
            if (col.Count > 0) return col;
        }
        return GetDB<t>();
    }
}

You'd need to implement GetDB() to return the appropriate db for any given type, but that'd be a single switch (or you can use reflection to find it)

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There are a couple of ways to do this. The best is probably a generic method:

public IEnumerable<T> dbSelect<T>() //may need type constraints here
{
    return db != null
           ? db.Select<T>()
           : null;
}
public IEnumerable<TypeOne> TypeOne
{
    get { return dbSelect<TypeOne> ?? db2.TypeOne; }
}
public IEnumerable<TypeTwo> TypeTwo
{
    get { return dbSelect<TypeTwo>() ?? db2.TypeTwo; }
}

If your db2 object has a generic Select<T>-type method like db does, it's even easier:

public IEnumerable<T> dbSelect<T>()
{
    return db != null
           ? db.Select<T>()
           : db2.Select<T>(); //or db2.GetEntities<T>() or db2.OfType<T> or whatever
}

//Later, in your main code...
var x = dbSelect<TypeOne>();
var y = dbSelect<TypeTwo>();

This will be type safe, considerably faster than reflection, and will work with Intellisense.

share|improve this answer
    
There are duplicated Properties. I want to resolve PropertyName at runtime without writing code like public IEnumerable<TypeOne> TypeOne { get { return dbSelect<TypeOne> ?? db2.TypeOne; } } –  Dmitry Dashko Oct 9 '12 at 15:29
    
In that case you don't really need the properties. I'll edit. –  Justin Morgan Oct 9 '12 at 15:31
    
i have some project with Linq queries, but i need to replace some datastore with another. Simplified code replacement is not interesting for me =). I want to try something new –  Dmitry Dashko Oct 9 '12 at 15:38
    
There is wrong idea that you give. I want to resolve called property name. –  Dmitry Dashko Oct 9 '12 at 15:40
    
I understand wanting to try something new, I really do. Reflection is fun, but this isn't the place for it. Using reflection for this will make your code more difficult to work with, and it will be a SIGNIFICANT performance hit. If your goal is to be the best coder you can be, I urge you not to use something like reflection where you don't need it. –  Justin Morgan Oct 9 '12 at 15:46
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You can solve this by using generics:

public IEnumerable<TypeOne> TypeOne
{
    get { return GetTable<TypeOne>(); }
}

public IEnumerable<TypeTwo> TypeTwo
{
    get { return GetTable<TypeTwo>(); }
}

private IEnumerable<T> GetTable<T>()
{
    if (db != null)
    {
        var col = db.Select<T>();
        if (col.Count > 0) return col;
    }

    return db2.Select<T>();    
}
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2  
Are you sure any of this actually uses reflection? ...I could be wrong though –  musefan Oct 9 '12 at 15:28
    
GetTypes is reflection –  Micah Armantrout Oct 9 '12 at 15:30
    
@MicahArmantrout - No, it isn't. He's just given it the same name as an unrelated method that does involve reflection. Steven - musefan is right, generics and reflection aren't the same in C#. Their types are determined at compile time. –  Justin Morgan Oct 9 '12 at 16:00
    
I agree ... its a generic and its reflection but they are not the same System.Reflection.Assembly.GetTypes -> msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Micah Armantrout Oct 9 '12 at 16:03
1  
@musefan and Justin, you are right, of course. It was a silly mistake (fixed), made because I rushed my answer. Generics and reflection can be considered the opposite, in this situation. In general, you should try to prevent reflection. I also renamed GetTypes<T> to GetTable<T> to make the distinction clear. –  Steven Oct 9 '12 at 18:16
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