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Upcasting and generic lists

Ok, I want to send a List<CardHolder> as an IEnumerable<ICardHolder> where CardHolder : ICardHolder. However, the compiler errors:

Error 4 Argument '1': cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.List' to 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable'

This seems strange to me, considering that an List<T> : IEnumerable<T>. What's going wrong?

public interface ICardHolder
{
    List<Card> Cards { get; set; } 
}

public class CardHolder : ICardHolder
{
    private List<Card> cards = new List<Card>();
    public List<Card> Cards
    {
        get { return cards; }
        set { cards = value; }
    }

    // ........
}

public class Deck : ICardHolder
{
    // .........

    public void Deal(IEnumerable<ICardHolder> cardHolders)
    {
         // ........
    }

    // .........
}

public class Game
{
    Deck deck = new Deck();
    List<CardHolder> players = new List<CardHolder>();

    // .........

    deck.Deal(players); // Problem is here!

    // .........
}
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marked as duplicate by John Saunders, Brian Rasmussen, Pavel Minaev, John Kugelman, Henk Holterman Aug 14 '09 at 21:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is that List<T> is not a subtype of IEnumerable<T1> even if T : T1.

Generics in C# (before C# 4.0) are 'invariant' (ie. don't have this sub-typing relationship). In .Net 4, IEnumerable<T> will have its type parameter annotated as being 'covariant'. This means that List<T> will be a subtype of IEnumerable<T1> if T : T1.

See this page on MSDN for more details of this feature.

Edit - You can work around this in your case by making the Deal method generic:

public void Deal<T>(IEnumerable<T> cardHolders) where T : ICardHolder
{
     // ........
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK, so I need to convert my List<CardHolder> to List<ICardHolder> to be able to send it as an IEnumerable<ICardHolder>? Oh, and is it possible to get some sort of preview for C# 4.0 on VS2008? –  Callum Rogers Aug 14 '09 at 21:41
1  
There an excellent InfoQ article on co/contravariance in Generics here: infoq.com/news/2008/08/GenericVariance –  joshua.ewer Aug 14 '09 at 21:41
    
+50 for generic method (if I could). Thank you! –  Callum Rogers Aug 14 '09 at 21:50

A List<CardHolder> is a IEnumerable<CardHolder>, but a IEnumerable<CardHolder> is not a IEnumerable<ICardHolder>. The two interfaces are unrelated (except for their structure).

C# 4.0 introduces covariance and contravariance, which can solve this kind of problem

Meanwhile, In C# 3.0, you can do :

deck.Deal(players.Cast<ICardHolder>());

It should have no significant performance impact, since the collection is only enumerated once, and the upcast to ICardHolder is a no-op in MSIL

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Adding to Ben's answer, you should replace the line:

    List<CardHolder> players = new List<CardHolder>();

with:

    List<ICardHolder> players = new List<ICardHolder>();

You're better off with interfaces anyway... :)

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Unfortunately, this doesn't work with the rest of the code I have, as it need to access some specific properties of CardHolder that ICardHolder doesn't (and cannot) have. But thanks anyway. –  Callum Rogers Aug 14 '09 at 21:43
    
for CardHolder specific properties, you can always cast to CardHolder... –  Thomas Levesque Aug 14 '09 at 21:48

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