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I need to add a function in my multidimensional array.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

void array(int a[][],int sizeRow,int sizeColumn){ 
    for(int x=0;x<sizeRow;x++)
        for(int y=0;y<sizeColumn;y++)
            cin>>a[x][y];
}

void array2(int a[][],int sizeRow,int sizeColumn){
    for(int x=0;x<sizeRow;x++){
        for(int y=0;y<sizeColumn;y++)
            cout<<a[x][y]<<"  ";
        cout<<"\n\n";
    }  
}

int main(){
    int row,column;
    cout<<"Enter Row: ";
    cin>>row;

    cout<<"Enter Column: ";
    cin>>column;

    int a[row][column];
    cout<<"Enter integers: ";
    array(a,row,column);

    cout<<"\nOutput is: \n";
    array2(a,row,column);

    system("pause");
}

In this program I will input how many rows and how many columns should be in the multidimensional array. then after that, I will input the integers. And it should show the output but i keep getting errors.
I just based it on the Single array function i found on youtube.
I'm noob when it come to this so I have no idea what to do.
This is one of my projects at school. I'd really appreciate it if you can teach me some techniques on how to do this easier or how to fix it.

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closed as too localized by jogojapan, BЈовић, hochl, andrewsi, angainor Oct 9 '12 at 22:32

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Surely if this is one of your projects, you've learned how to properly (at least from a C point of view) dynamically allocate the memory you need. –  chris Oct 9 '12 at 15:47
1  
C++ doesn't handle "variable length arrays", i.e. the declaration int a[row][column] is not valid in C++. If you need dynamic arrays in C++ you should use std::vector. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 9 '12 at 15:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In C/C++ you can skip only "first" dimension, like in this example:

#include <iostream>
void process(int a[][7]) { a[1][1] = 9; }
int main() {
   int a[3][7]; process(a);
   std::cout << a[1][1] << std::endl;
}

Otherwise, how the compiler would know where is a[1][1] whit this definition: a[][]? If it has a[][7] it knows it is: (int*)a + 1*7 + 1, this 7 is necessary!

In your program it is not possible since you do not know any of dimensions before run time, so, well, just use one dimension version:

void array(int a[],int size){ 
    for(int x=0;x<size;x++)
        cin>>a[x];
}

void array2(int a[],int sizeRow,int sizeColumn){
    for(int x=0;x<sizeRow;x++){
        int* row = a + x * sizeColumn; // can be done better...
        for(int y=0;y<sizeColumn;y++)
            cout<<row[y]<<"  ";
        cout<<"\n\n";
    }  
}

int main(){
    int row,column;
    cout<<"Enter Row: ";
    cin>>row;

    cout<<"Enter Column: ";
    cin>>column;

    int a[row][column];
    cout<<"Enter integers: ";
    array(&a[0][0],row*column);

    cout<<"\nOutput is: \n";
    array2(&a[0][0],row,column);

    system("pause");
}

And last notes:

  1. Already mentioned in comments that int a[row][column] is not allowed in pure C++ when dimensions are not constants
  2. However this is allowed in C, and it is called variable length arrays VLA - just replace cout/cin with printf/scanf and this is C program.
  3. In C++ I'd advice to use std::vector.
  4. If this is gcc - gcc has VLA as C++ extension.
share|improve this answer
    
You did not fix the array allocation from the original question. int a[row][column]; should be int a* = new int[row * column];. You should probably add a delete [] a as well. –  Geoff Montee Oct 9 '12 at 23:34
    
@Geoff_Montee: 1) Already mentioned in comments that this is not allowed in C++. 2) In "newest" C variable length array are allowed - replacing cout/cin with printf/scanf and this is just C program. 3) In C++ I'd advice to use std::vector. 4) And probably this is gcc - gcc has VLA as C++ extension. –  PiotrNycz Oct 9 '12 at 23:48
    
That's correct. It was not clear from your answer that you designed this answer as some mixture of C++ (with cin/cout) and C (with VLAs). You should probably make a note of this for the newbies who already find pointers and arrays confusing. –  Geoff Montee Oct 9 '12 at 23:53
    
@Geoff_Montee I'll add. However this question is closed. I really do not understand why it is "too localized". If this question is "too localized" then 90% questions on SO are too localized too;) –  PiotrNycz Oct 10 '12 at 0:08
    
Fair enough. My only experiences with SO up until today were from searching for information about my own technical questions. So that's the perspective that I am speaking from. The broadly answered questions always seemed like the most useful. –  Geoff Montee Oct 10 '12 at 0:12

As others have mentioned, you can't pass multi-dimensioned arrays into functions in C++ without knowing the dimensions ahead of time.

However, you can use a pointer to pointers.

Each row is essentially its own dynamic array.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

void array(int **a, int sizeRow, int sizeColumn)
{ 
  for(int x=0; x < sizeRow; x++) 
  {
    int* row = a[x];

    for(int y=0; y < sizeColumn; y++)
        cin >> row[y];
  }
}

void array2(int **a, int sizeRow, int sizeColumn)
{
    for(int x=0; x < sizeRow; x++)
    {
        int* row = a[x];

        for(int y=0; y < sizeColumn; y++)
            cout << row[y] << "  ";

        cout << "\n\n";
    }  
}

int main()
{
  int row,column;
  cout << "Enter Row: ";
  cin >> row;

  cout << "Enter Column: ";
  cin >> column;

  /Allocate a pointer for each row
  int** a = new int*[row];

  //In each row...
  for (int count = 0; count < row; count++) 
  {
     //Allocate the number of columns required.
     a[count] = new int[column];
  }

  cout << "Enter integers: ";
  array(a,row,column);

  cout << "\nOutput is: \n";
  array2(a,row,column);

  for (int count = 0; count < row; count++)
  {
      delete [] a[count];
  }

  delete [] a;

  system("pause");
}
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