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I'd like to figure out how to reuse or "alias" layouts with the least boilerplate code.

It seems that the Android documentation about layout aliases is incorrect, and certainly appears inconsistent. This section of documentation shows the following layout file as an example:

<resources>
    <item name="main" type="layout">@layout/main_twopanes</item>
</resources>

If I try to compile this, I get an Attribute is missing the Android namespace prefix error. Even after adding the namespace to the resources element, I get error: Error: String types not allowed (at 'type' with value 'layout').

Elsewhere in the Android documentation, they show a different and seemingly inverted and incorrect way to alias layouts:

To create an alias to an existing layout, use the element, wrapped in a <merge>. For example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<merge>
    <include layout="@layout/main_ltr"/>
</merge>

Running this results in the following error in LogCat E/AndroidRuntime(1558): android.view.InflateException: <merge /> can be used only with a valid ViewGroup root and attachToRoot=true. So this error seems to reinforce the fact that this <include> <merge> pair must be a mistake, because it requires an unnecessary parent View.

Lastly there's the <merge> documentation, which seems to contradict the former direction, making no mention of the inverted form of a top-level <merge><include/></merge>.

To avoid including such a redundant view group, you can instead use the element as the root view for the re-usable layout. For example:

<merge xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <Button
        android:layout_width="fill_parent" 
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="@string/add"/>

    <Button
        android:layout_width="fill_parent" 
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="@string/delete"/>

</merge>
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1  
The first method seems to compile and work fine for me. Do you have the latest SDK Tools installed? –  Joe Oct 10 '12 at 1:48
    
@Joe thanks for verifying this! It ends up I didn't read the instructions carefully. I did what I thought I should do--put the layout.xml inside the layout-large rather than values-large folder. –  Jeff Axelrod Oct 10 '12 at 2:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first technique works, you just have to put your <resources> file in the correct folder. It should be in the values folders not the layout folders as you might when reusing layouts via <include>.

For instance, suppose you have a layout named editor.xml that lives in the layout folder. Suppose you want to use a specialized layout on small and normal screen sizes. If you didn't care about repeating yourself, you would just copy and paste this layout into the layout-small and layout-normal folders and name it editor.xml in each folder. So you'd have three files named editor.xml.

If you don't want to repeat yourself, you would place the specialized layout in the main layout folder and name it, say, compact_editor.xml. Then you'd create a file named layout.xml in the values-small and values-normal folders. Each file would read:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <item name="editor" type="layout">@layout/compact_editor</item>
</resources>

I've filed a documentation issue about the other two problems.

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"this inverted use of merge seems to be undocumented otherwise" -- the reason the <merge> is needed is that <include> is not supported as a root element, for some reason. Otherwise, this use of <merge> is normal. <merge> says "here's a bunch of widgets and containers that need to go in some indeterminate parent", with <merge> serving as the root XML element (since XML needs one). In this case, the "bunch of widgets and containers" happen to be stored in another layout resource, hence the <include>. –  CommonsWare Oct 9 '12 at 16:18
    
@CommonsWare Sounds reasonable, but this is your interpretation based on your understanding of <merge> not its actual documentation. –  Jeff Axelrod Oct 9 '12 at 16:26
    
Well, the actual documentation isn't exactly going to win a prize, but there is nothing in there that I see that contradicts what I wrote. –  CommonsWare Oct 9 '12 at 16:27
    
@CommonsWare Okay, note this new issue: Support <include> as a top-level element so we don't need to surround it with <merge> –  Jeff Axelrod Oct 9 '12 at 16:32
1  
@CommonsWare You're probably tired of discussing this, but after actually testing the second option in a ListView, the inflater fails. See my question edit: Running this results in the following error in LogCat E/AndroidRuntime(1558): android.view.InflateException: <merge /> can be used only with a valid ViewGroup root and attachToRoot=true. So this error seems to reinforce the fact that this <include> <merge> pair must be a mistake, because it requires an unnecessary parent View. –  Jeff Axelrod Oct 10 '12 at 1:12

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