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In my app I have a picturebox and 2 buttons("Yes" and "No"). Yes adds 1 to the resultlist, No adds 0 and both go to the next picture. Now I need to implement a timer in the app which makes the picture go to the next if no answer supplied. I thought to use a backgroundworker for it.

Code below switches the pictures fine when I don't click a button. Clicking a button freezes the UI because the backgroundworker stays "Busy". I do understand that CancelAsync does not stop the backgroundworker immediatelly, but the return-statement in DoWork is actually hit.

So my question here is why does the backgroundworker stay busy or am I totally going the wrong way here?

    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnLoad(e);
        Counter = 0;

        _backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
        _backgroundWorker.DoWork += _backgroundWorker_DoWork;
        _backgroundWorker.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
        _backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    private void _backgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        BackgroundWorker bgw = sender as BackgroundWorker;

        GoToNextItem(); //Show next picture
        while (!bgw.CancellationPending) 
        {
            _getNext = false;
            Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            //Wait interval-time
            while (!_getNext)
            {
                 if ((sw.ElapsedMilliseconds > Test.Interval * 1000) && !bgw.CancellationPending)
                {
                    _getNext = true;
                }
                if (bgw.CancellationPending)
                {
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    return; //Breakpoint is hit here
                }
            }
            if (_getNext)
            {
               Result.Add(0);
                GoToNextItem();
            }
        }
        e.Cancel = true;
    }

    private void btnNo_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
        Result.Add(0);

        while (_backgroundWorker.IsBusy)
        {
        _backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(20);
        }
        _backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    private void btnYes_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
        Result.Add(1);

        while (_backgroundWorker.IsBusy) //Stays busy ==> UI freezes here
        {
            _backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(20);
        }
        _backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

Edit

Changed the code by using a Timer as suggested by @Servy. For more elaboration about the backgroundworker-question, read the comments of the accepted answer.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should just use a System.Windows.Forms.Timer for this.

private System.Windows.Forms.Timer timer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();
public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    timer.Interval = 5000;
    timer.Tick += timer_Tick;
    timer.Start();
}

private void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //runs in UI thread; code to go to next picture goes here
}

private void btnYes_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    timer.Start();
}
private void btnNo_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    timer.Start();
}

You'll want to call Start in the yes and no button clicks as well because it resets the timer, that way you'll go back to the start of your countdown for the next picture.

You can call Stop anytime you want it to stop firing.

As for why your current code freezes the UI, it's because your click event handlers run in the UI thread, and they are calling Sleep while waiting on the background workers. I wouldn't suggest trying to fix that approach, you should use a timer, but if you did want to you would need to attach an event handler to the completed/canceled event of the background worker and do everything that you are currently doing after the "wait until BGW is ready" in those other handlers rather than waiting in the UI thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems ok to change my code. Thanks. This will solve my issue, however I'm still wondering why the BGW stays busy even if it exited the Do_Work. I had just tested another approach by doing _BackgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker, adding event and call RunAsync. And that actually worked. –  Koen Oct 9 '12 at 16:27
1  
@Koen As I explained in my answer, the problem isn't in the DoWork, the problem is that your button handlers are sleeping while they wait for the GBW to finish up, and that's what's blocking the UI. –  Servy Oct 9 '12 at 16:29
    
Sorry, didin't quite understand it, but after reading @JYelton's post. I got it. I was under the impression that exiting the DoWork did finish up de BGW. –  Koen Oct 9 '12 at 16:40
    
@Koen As I've said several times, the fundamental approach you are using is flawed, in many ways. Even if you get it to work, it won't be stable, it will be extremely inefficient, and it's a lot more work than just using a timer. Your background worker is doing a busywait (which is pretty much always a bad thing), you're blocking the UI thread (DoEvents just hides the problem, it doesn't fix it, and it will result in subtle dangerous bugs later on), and you seem to be trying to re-use a background worker (they weren't designed for that). –  Servy Oct 9 '12 at 16:46
1  
@Koen BackgroundWorker is a great tool, and you shouldn't avoid using it in general, you just should avoid having any code in any app (especially UI applications) that is waiting on something else. Anytime you think you want to wait, you really want to use event to have an event trigger when you want to do...whatever. If you want to do something when a task completes, you use BGW, when you want to wait a fixed amount of time, you use a Timer. –  Servy Oct 9 '12 at 16:58

When you click a button, you're telling the background worker to cancel, but you're also immediately starting a thread sleep, which basically doesn't give the background worker enough time to effectively cancel.

I tested your approach and added an Application.DoEvents() line as follows:

while (_backgroundWorker.IsBusy)
{
    _backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
    Application.DoEvents();
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(20);
}

This allows the background worker to cancel more quickly, but I believe usage of Application.DoEvents() in this way is a code smell. I'd recommend going with the method @Servy suggests.

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Thanks. I did. I was told once that one should avoid using Application.DoEvents() if possible. I just made a bad call to begin with by using the BGW if a Timer is so much easier in my case. –  Koen Oct 9 '12 at 17:08

The way you are using background worker is wrong I feel..you should do things which should run in background while not making UI hang..

But in your case there is no such requirement..

Just use timer control for doing the same and also disable your YES/NO buttons in GoToNextItem method and enable back at the end..

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