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def countup(k, n):
     'counts up from k to n'
     if k == n:
         print(k)
     elif n <= 0:
         print("Let's go!")
     else:
         print(k)
         countup(k+1,n)

I want to add a print statement of "Let's Go" before the recursion starts so it would look like this:

countup(3,6)

Let's Go!
3
4
5
6

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can write a wrapper function like this

def countup(k,n):
    print "Let's Go"
    _countup(k,n)

def _countup(k, n):
     'counts up from k to n'
     if k == n:
         print(k)
     else:
         print(k)
         _countup(k+1,n)
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Thanks, this works well if I replace the 10th line with pass, so It doesn't add 2 Let's Go!'s if n is negative. –  user1727585 Oct 9 '12 at 16:35
    
@user1727585 I must have missed that elif that was there. I removed it as it became unnecessary, and for some values of n and k wrong, after my edits. –  Matt Oct 9 '12 at 16:45

Move the recursion into a second function, and have the first function output the string and then call the second function.

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Print before the line, where you are invoking that method for the first time?? Of course you cannot jump into recursion directly.. right??

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use a default argument:

def countup(k, n,go=None):
     'counts up from k to n'
     if go:
         print go
     if k == n:
         print(k)
     elif n <= 0:
         print("Let's go!")
     else:
         print(k)
         countup(k+1,n)
countup(3,6,"Lets go")

output:

Lets go
3
4
5
6
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You can do it from the calling function, or have countup be another function that prints "Let's go!" before calling the recursive one.

If you're hellbent on doing it from inside the recursion, try switching it around so you start at the top and recurse down (untested, but it works inside my head):

def countupwithletsgo(k, n):
    if k == n:
        print("Let's go!")
        print(n)
    else:
        countupwithletsgo(k, n-1)
        print(n)

Note the unwieldy function name - usually a good sign it's doing more than just one thing and should probably be refactored. Like into the wrapper-function form suggested first.

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For silly stuff like this, I use keyword arguments:

def count_up_or_down(k, n, start=True):
     'counts up from k to n'

     if(start):
         print("Let's go!")
     if k == n:
         print(k)
     else:
         print(k)
         sign = 1 if n>k else -1
         count_up_or_down(k+sign,n,start=False)

count_up_or_down(3,6)

But really, functions are generally supposed to do 1 thing (and do that one thing well). You're asking for a function which does 2 unrelated things (prints "Lets go!" and counts). It's definitely better to factor those two unrelated actions into 2 separate functions/statements.

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This works very well with some exceptions. I know I didn't mention this in the top, but It needs to be able to do countup(1,0) and countup(1,-1) with the out put:"Let's Go" –  user1727585 Oct 9 '12 at 16:25
    
@user1727585 -- I assume you want to count up or down. I've added that to my solution. –  mgilson Oct 9 '12 at 16:29

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