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Help! This box is exactly the same size as the length of the text at 100% zoom on IE and Chrome. But, when viewed on my mobile phone, the box overhangs the length of the text. Is it possible to fix this?

<style type="text/css">
#box{
width:375px;
background:blue;
font-size:16px;
font-family:Courier New, Courier, monospace;
}

#textbox{
background:pink;
font-size:16px;
font-family:Courier New, Courier, monospace;
}
</style>

<html>
<head>
<div id="box">Box</div>
<div id="textbox">|1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ|</div>
</head>
</html>
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3  
Personally I would say never rely on a font width unless you have control over all devices and browsers it will be seen on. You never know when something's going to be rendered a pixel wider than it's supposed to be. –  Eric Oct 9 '12 at 16:55
    
Why set the box width at all? Let the content determine the width. I assume that issue is likely happening because one of those browsers is using a different font. ie two are using Courier New and one is using Courier. –  Rick Calder Oct 9 '12 at 17:10
    
Thanks for the fast response, Eric. Regrettably, it's part of a larger css animation project where I've resolved to use absolute positioning for the elements. –  Jennifer Lost Oct 9 '12 at 17:11
    
The problem also shows up when I zoom in Chrome and IE. –  Jennifer Lost Oct 9 '12 at 17:12

1 Answer 1

Firstly, browsers will interpret font widths differently. Relying on the width of fonts is not ideal.

Instead, if you want the boxes to match the same width, wrap a <div> around them and set it.

<div class="wrapper">
<div id="box">Box</div>
<div id="textbox">|1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ|</div>
</div>

A couple other problems with the code you posted.

  1. You must put your embedded styles inside of the head tags.
  2. You must never put anything before the <html> tag except <!doctype>
  3. Never put <div>'s inside of a head. They only belong in the <body>

The <head> is used to initialize data. The <body> is used to display data.

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