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I need to make a critical section in an area on the basis of a finite set of strings. I want the lock to be shared for the same string instance, (somewhat similar to String.Intern approach).

I am considering the following implementation:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly string _s;
    private static readonly HashSet<string> _locks = new HashSet<string>();

    public Foo(string s)
    {
        _s = s;
        _locks.Add(s);
    }

    public void LockMethod()
    {
        lock(_locks.Single(l => l == _s))
        {
            ...
        }
    }
}

Are there any problems with this approach? Is it OK to lock on a string object in this way, and are there any thread safety issues in using the HashSet<string>?

Is it better to, for example, create a Dictionary<string, object> that creates a new lock object for each string instance?


Final Implementation

Based on the suggestions I went with the following implementation:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly string _s;
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<string, object> _locks = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, object>();

    public Foo(string s)
    {
        _s = s;
    }

    public void LockMethod()
    {
        lock(_locks.GetOrAdd(_s, new object()))
        {
            ...
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I point out some of the quirks of using a string as the lock target in my answer here. –  Brian Gideon Oct 11 '12 at 20:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Locking on strings is discouraged, the main reason is that (through interning) some other code could lock on the same string without you knowing this. Creating a potential for deadlock situations.

Now this is probably a far fetched scenario in most concrete situations. It's more a general rule for libraries.

But on the other hand, what is the perceived benefit of strings?

So, point for point:

Are there any problems with this approach?

Yes, but mostly theoretical.

Is it OK to lock on a string object in this way, and are there any thread safety issues in using the HashSet?

The HashSet<> is not involved in the thread-safety as long as the threads only read concurrently.

Is it better to, for example, create a Dictionary that creates a new lock object for each string instance?

Yes. Just to be on the safe side. In a large system the main aim for avoiding deadlock is to keep the lock-objects as local and private as possible. Only a limited amount of code should be able to access them.

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Accepted as I thought this answer most comprehensively addressed the specific questions. –  Zaid Masud Oct 9 '12 at 17:30

I'd say it's a really bad idea, personally. That isn't what strings are for.

(Personally I dislike the fact that every object has a monitor in the first place, but that's a slightly different concern.)

If you want an object which represents a lock which can be shared between different instances, why not create a specific type for that? You can given the lock a name easily enough for diagnostic purposes, but locking is really not the purpose of a string. Something like this:

public sealed class Lock
{
    private readonly string name;

    public string Name { get { return name; } }

    public Lock(string name)
    {
        if (name == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("name");
        }
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Given the way that strings are sometimes interned and sometimes not (in a way which can occasionally be difficult to discern by simple inspection), you could easily end up with accidentally shared locks where you didn't intend them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ... would a static ConcurrentDictionary<string, object> to replace the HashSet<string> that creates a new lock object for every string be a good approach? –  Zaid Masud Oct 9 '12 at 17:07
    
@ZaidMasud: You'd still have a static (global) set of locks, which doesn't sound like a good design to me. I very rarely find that statics for mutable state ends up being a good thing. –  Jon Skeet Oct 9 '12 at 17:09
    
Nitpicking maybe: "create a specific type" or "create a specific instance" ? –  Henk Holterman Oct 9 '12 at 17:11
    
I'm not sure if I'm following this completely... if it's a private static Dictionary the lock objects would be contained to that class only. Also I'm not sure what the new lock type would look like, unless you mean new object instance as @HenkHolterman is suggesting. –  Zaid Masud Oct 9 '12 at 17:12
1  
@ZaidMasud: There are two entirely separate concerns here: a) a global collection of locks (avoid if possible); b) what to lock on (not strings; object would be okay, Lock would be better) –  Jon Skeet Oct 9 '12 at 17:31

Locking on strings can be problematic, because interned strings are essentially global.

Interned strings are per process, so they are even shared among different AppDomains. Same goes for type objects (so don't lock on typeof(x)) either.

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1  
Sometimes per-process lock variables are what you are looking for ;p –  leppie Oct 9 '12 at 17:14
    
@leppie certainly, but it may not be obvious that strings/type objects have this "feature". –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 9 '12 at 17:32
    
By the way it seems that string interning is only an issue for literal strings. So if the strings are not being created as literals the whole concern is a bit overblown in my opinion. –  Zaid Masud Oct 11 '12 at 12:56
1  
Literal strings are interned by default, but you can intern any string if you want. The point here is that you can't tell if the string is interned or not by simply looking at the usage of a string reference. IMO there's no benefit in locking on a string and given that it may cause hard to find problems in some situation it is better to just avoid it. –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 11 '12 at 13:26
    
@BrianRasmussen yes agreed. –  Zaid Masud Oct 11 '12 at 21:14

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