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I can't seem to find a definitive answer to this and I am sure I am not the first or last to fret about it.

Current best practices recommends placing javascripts at the bottom of the page. However, any blocks that fire using proper $(function() {...}); will fail to find $.

While its not specific to just the twitter bootstrap, I am using that for my layout and such. The application layout that twitter produced moved the scripts to the bottom.

So JQuery needs to be present in the page before the blocks are processed.

Is it better to separate just the JQuery library and include that in the head and the rest via application.js at the end of the page or is it better to allow the asset pipeline to create one file and send it all at once?

Obviously, there are tradeoffs, but what's the general consensus?

The answer: move your javascripts out of the html and into external files ..is not exactly what I am hoping for :)

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1 Answer 1

The asset pipeline should compile all necessary JavaScript into as few files as possible, serving those. These files should include jQuery and should be placed in the head tag for your layout.

Perhaps the Asset Pipeline Guide will help?

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Hi @Ryan, Thanks for the response and the link, but it doesn't address the best practice recommendation to move scripts to the end of the page. If you are saying that this is not recommended for Rails, or that the asset pipeline minification strategy is superior to splitting the files into dependencies vs post-load behavior, then I am satisfied with the answer. The fact that the twitter-bootstrap-rails gem produces a template with all the scripts at the end of the page tells that at least some dev'rs are adopting. –  levous Oct 10 '12 at 0:24

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