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I am just learning sorting(not for the first time). In Bubble sort, we have the following as the code.

int bubble_sort(int *arr, size_t n) {

 size_t i,j;
  for(i=0;i<n;i++) {
     for(j=0;j<n-1;j++) {
             if(arr[j] > arr[j+1]) {
                    int temp = arr[j];
                    arr[j] = arr[j+1];
                    arr[j+1] = temp;
             }
     }
 }

return 0;
}

As you could all see, the inner loop has (n-1) times (in for loop), which is understandable(a[i],a[i-1] is both involved in one iteration), but the outer loop have i < n, but it also works for i < n-1. But most implementation in internet have n as the outer loop value. Doing the outer loop n-1 works fine for worst case 5 4 3 2 1. Just wondering, if there is any set of inputs that will not work for n-1 times of outer loop . If there are please post it and explain. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Note that the classic bubble sort's inner loop has n-i iterations, and not n-1. – amit Oct 9 '12 at 17:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

N-1 is fine as well. As you describe, the worst case requires N-1 swaps (as the last has to become the first and vise-versa). If you add a print of the i-variable to the inside of the if-statement, you'll see that it's never called in the last iteration. This means that the last iteration of the loop never results in any swapping.

An even more efficient implementation of Bubblesort does not use a for-loop as an outer loop, though. Have a look at the bit of code below. Can you see the execution difference?

int bubble_sort(int *arr, size_t n) {
    size_t i,j;
    int flag = 1;
    while (flag) {
        flag = 0;
        for(j=0;j<n-1;j++) {
            if(arr[j] > arr[j+1]) {
                int temp = arr[j];
                arr[j] = arr[j+1];
                arr[j+1] = temp;
                flag = 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

By setting the flag only if actual swapping occured, you'll end up jumping out of the loop much sooner when you're in an average case.

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Yeah, I have done this.... thats why I wanted to find the real bubble sort and efficient one's comparison – howtechstuffworks Oct 9 '12 at 17:45
    
When approaching comparison from a Complexity point of view, you'll see that the worst case is identical (plus or minus a few constants), whereas the best case is better (n rather than n^2) and the average case is better by a constant factor. – Joost Oct 9 '12 at 17:48
    
The fact that the worst case requires n-1 iterations is not enough on its own to make the claim correct. The claim is correct however, and one can formally prove it (I tried to provide guidelines how to prove it in my answer). – amit Oct 9 '12 at 17:54

No, there is no such input.

The rational is in Bubble-sort's proof. Recall that when proving that in bubble sort's i'th (outer) iteration - the i last elements are in place and sorted.

Thus, after the n-1 iteration, the last n-1 elements are in place and sorted, leaving only the remaining first element - that can be only in its correct place, the first place in the array.

(So, using this approach we can prove that bubble sort needs n-1 outer iterations at most)


Also note: classic bubble sort needs only n-i iterations in the inner loop (because of the rational I mentioned above), and NOT n-1.

share|improve this answer
    
It is important to note that you'll have to iterate from 0 to n-i, not from i to n-1 (which are both n-i iterations). – Joost Oct 9 '12 at 17:59

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