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I've got a bit of an issue that I'm unsure if it's a browser thing or a CSS3 thing.

I have a datagrid using a standard HTML table:

<table>
    <thead>
        ...
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr class="found">
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
        </tr>
        <tr class="found">
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
        </tr>
        <tr class="found">
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
            <td>...</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

I have a jQuery function that is searching the contents of the TD elements. If it's found, it maintains the found class. If it's not found, then it removes the found class and and adds a not-found class. Naturally, not-found just sets display: none

So the search function is working the way I'd like. Classes are being assigned appropriately. However, I'm using CSS pseudo selectors to apply styling to alternate rows.

tr.found:nth-child(even) {
    background: #fff;
}
tr.found:nth-child(odd) {
    background: #000;
}

This works out great before a search takes place. However, after a search and the not-found class is applied, the pseudo selector seems to apply only to the element rather than the element and the class. Either that, or the pseudo selectors are applied during page load and are left static at that point.

I could go through in my jQuery search and reassign specific even and odd classes, but that gets messy. It wouldn't be that big of a deal, but my column headers are sortable, so I'd have to reapply classes on that event as well creating kind of an inefficient method to do what I'm doing. If data samples get too large, you would likely be able to see the class changes iteratively, something I'm attempting to avoid.

Any solutions to this?

EDIT

As requested, I setup a JSFiddle so you geniuses can toy with it: http://jsfiddle.net/bDePR/

Searching for President or Secretary will yield the behavior.

share|improve this question
1  
A good question - I might suggest creating a jsFiddle example so that everyone has a reasonable starting point to work from... –  KP. Oct 9 '12 at 17:57
    
@KP. - I've added the JSFiddle as requested. –  Brian Oct 9 '12 at 18:09
    
tr.found:nth-child(even) is counting every tr element, not just the tr elements with the class of 'found', that's your problem. I can't think of a decent solution though.. You could remove the elements from the DOM and put them back in. That'll work but.. not ideal. Hmm. Good question. –  Dax Kieran Oct 9 '12 at 18:26
    
@mdk is correct, as the nth-child according to the docs matches an element that has an+b-1 siblings before it in the document tree, as in even the siblings that don't actually match the css selector. –  Patrick Oct 9 '12 at 18:53
1  
nth-child and nth-of-type are limited to elements, not classes. So .found:nth-of-type(odd) would logically appear to select every odd .found, but doesn't. However, tr:nth-of-type(odd) would work because it is an element selector, not class. So unfortunately a pure CSS selector method isn't possible here. In terms of efficiency, updating the classes wouldn't be pretty quick if your table isn't too big and your selectors appropriate. I personally wouldn't do this server side so you don't mix your styling in to your logic - that could end up getting messy. Definitely stay client side. –  amustill Oct 9 '12 at 19:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is the simplest method I could come up with, use the jQuery :visible selector to find all the visible tr elements (after they have been sorted) then simply apply CSS to alternating ones!

// reset the background
$j('tr').css('background', '#ccc');
$j('tr:visible').each(function(i){
    if((i % 2) == 0) {
        // apply background to every other one
        $j(this).css('background', 'yellow');
    }
});

e.g. http://jsfiddle.net/bDePR/1/

Edit:

This, by @amustill does the same but is more efficient/concise

// reset the background
$j('tr').css('background', '#ccc');
$j('.found').filter(':odd').css({ background: 'yellow' });
share|improve this answer
    
That's likely the most efficient solution... much better than replacing DOM elements. Thanks! –  Brian Oct 9 '12 at 19:45
    
Indeed, that'd be overkill for what should be such a basic task. –  Dax Kieran Oct 9 '12 at 19:51
2  
Two things. Firstly, that :visible selector isn't required since all .found are visible, and it's highly inefficient without a context. Also, I would argue that using $j('.found').filter(':odd').css({ background: 'yellow'); is more efficient in setting the background colour. –  amustill Oct 9 '12 at 20:49
    
@amustill Absolutely agree, well spotted. Yours is much terser. –  Dax Kieran Oct 9 '12 at 21:10

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