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To illustrate my problem, suppose I have a data model where I have a collection of Books, each of which has one or more Drafts, and also a "current" Draft. I'd like my model to look something like this:

class Book
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Title { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Draft> Drafts { get; set; }

    public virtual Draft CurrentDraft { get; set; }
}

class Draft
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public virtual int BookId { get; set; }
    public virtual Book Book { get; set; }

    public string Description { get; set; }
}

I have a DbContext that looks like this:

class TestDbContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Book> Books { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Draft> Drafts { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();

        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    }
}

...and a simple program like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Database.SetInitializer<TestDbContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<TestDbContext>());

    using (var db = new TestDbContext())
    {
        var book = new Book() { Title = "War and Peace", Drafts = new List<Draft>() };


        var draft1 = new Draft() { Book = book, Description = "First Draft" };

        book.Drafts.Add(draft1);


        var draft2 = new Draft() { Book = book, Description = "Second Draft" };

        book.Drafts.Add(draft2);


        book.CurrentDraft = draft2;


        db.Books.Add(book);

        db.SaveChanges();


        foreach (var b in db.Books)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Book {0}: {1}", b.Id, b.Title);

            foreach (var d in book.Drafts)
                Console.WriteLine("\tDraft ID {0}: {1} from Book ID {2}", d.Id, d.Description, d.BookId);

            Console.WriteLine("Current draft has ID {0}", b.CurrentDraft.Id);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

When the DB is created by EF, it looks like this:

database schema

[I'm not wild about the extra Book_Id column, but I could live with it if it worked.]

Sadly, when I run the test program, it fails at the SaveChanges call, with an exception:

An error occurred while saving entities that do not expose foreign key properties for their relationships. The EntityEntries property will return null because a single entity cannot be identified as the source of the exception. Handling of exceptions while saving can be made easier by exposing foreign key properties in your entity types. See the InnerException for details.

I've tried messing about with the fluent API in my OnModelCreating, but when I try to configure it that way it gets confused by the fact that there are two FK relationships between Books and Drafts. I'm not familiar enough with the fluent stuff (or EF generally) to know how to do it properly.

Is this even possible in EF code first?

share|improve this question
    
What does the inner exception say? Is there a SQL exception being thrown? –  Ann L. Oct 9 '12 at 17:53
    
I usually work db-first, so may be off base, but doesn't Book want a CurrentDraftId property? –  mcalex Oct 9 '12 at 18:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your inner exception is that EF can't figure out the order to save things to the database to create something properly. If you call save changes in multiple places to force the order your test app will work:

            var book = new Book() { Title = "War and Peace", Drafts = new List<Draft>() };
            db.Books.Add(book);
            db.SaveChanges();
            var draft1 = new Draft() { Book = book, Description = "First Draft" };
            book.Drafts.Add(draft1);
            var draft2 = new Draft() { Book = book, Description = "Second Draft" };
            book.Drafts.Add(draft2);
            book.CurrentDraft = draft2;
            db.SaveChanges();

Regarding the second book_id - you could use this fluent:

        modelBuilder.Entity<Book>()
            .HasMany(b => b.Drafts)
            .WithRequired(d => d.Book)
            .HasForeignKey(d => d.BookId);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Book>()
            .HasOptional(b => b.CurrentDraft)
            .WithOptionalDependent()
            .Map(m => m.MapKey("CurrentDraftId"));

which produces this database:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
It will denormalize database. –  Kirill Bestemyanov Oct 9 '12 at 18:21
    
I've updated the fluent so BookId doesn't need to be null - however in order to force the order of creation (book then drafts) CurrentDraft will need to be optional. –  Mark Oreta Oct 9 '12 at 18:39
    
@MarkOreta: thanks muchly. This has worked in that I now have the DB structure I expected. It's a pity about the extra SaveChanges though. How would I go about making the two SaveChanges calls atomic? Wrap them in a TransactionScope? –  Gary McGill Oct 9 '12 at 22:33
    
FYI, the first fluent bit (configuring the main Book:Drafts relationship) does not appear to be necessary; if I remove it, it makes no difference. EF figures that much out for itself, it would seem. –  Gary McGill Oct 9 '12 at 22:49
    
Yeah, to make them atomic you can just wrap them in a Transaction Scope - keep in mind this will probably call up the DTC. –  Mark Oreta Oct 9 '12 at 23:43

If i were you i will add one more property to Draft that will be bool IsCurrent{get;set;}. And

public Draft CurrentDraft { get{return Drafts.SingleOrDefault(c=>c.IsCurrent)} }

In this case there will be one foreign key between books and drafts.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason for my wish to have a CurrentDraft property on the Book object is that there will be many, many Drafts, and the current one will be accessed very frequently. (Pretty much every time the Book object is accessed). In other words, it's an optimization - and I don't think having an extra column as you suggest would be as good in this respect. –  Gary McGill Oct 9 '12 at 18:39
    
I realize this is a year later, but I had the same issue and I'm using the IsCurrent method to resolve the error. You are trading one column for another. Drafts would have one more, and Books would have one less (since it's a calculated value and should be set to ignore in EF). –  RyanJMcGowan Sep 6 '13 at 21:50

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