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Json.NET (Newtonsoft.Json) - Two 'properties' with same name?

I'm using JSON.NET to deserialize a JSON file into a Dictionary. Now what I'd like to do is have the following line:

JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<IDictionary<string, object>>(text);

throw an exception if there are duplicate entries in the JSON like this:

{
    "ExampleText": "Example 1",
    "ExampleText": "Example 2",
    "ExampleText": "Example 3",
}

The standard JSON.NET behavior is to simply replace the "ExampleText" entry with whichever entry is last in the JSON. Is it possible to have the exception thrown instead?

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marked as duplicate by L.B, Toon Krijthe, hochl, 0x7fffffff, slugster Oct 10 '12 at 9:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It's not a duplicate. He wanted to support deserialization even though he had multiple entries with the same key. What I want is instead of just a replacement of the single TBox entry, I want an exception to be thrown telling me there are duplicate entries for the same key. –  shaqua471 Oct 9 '12 at 21:32
    
I actually found a way to do what I wanted but I had to use JsonTextReader to parse each token myself. It feels a little dirty but it allows me to insure that an exception gets thrown in the case of a duplicate entry. –  shaqua471 Oct 9 '12 at 21:35
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

--EDIT--

You dont need to deserialize to IDictionary<string, object>. JObject already implements IDictionary<string, JToken>

var obj = (JObject)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(json); //will throw exception for dublicates.
var str = (string)obj["ExampleText"];
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This won't throw an exception in the case of a duplicate entry. –  shaqua471 Oct 9 '12 at 21:36
    
@shaqua471 Is this a question? If yes, No. –  L.B Oct 9 '12 at 21:38
    
That was the whole point of my question. I want an easy way to have an exception thrown when I deserialize and duplicate entries exist. –  shaqua471 Oct 10 '12 at 0:32
    
@shaqua471 I updated the answer. –  L.B Oct 10 '12 at 8:54
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If you look to IDictionary in msdn

"Each association must have a unique key"

Your problem in duplicated keys. I think you should use another collection.

Try this

class MyValue
{
  public string Key {get; set;}
  public string Value {get; set;}
}

JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<MyValue>>(text);
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Have you tried to deserialize the json in question to List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> ? –  L.B Oct 9 '12 at 19:23
    
You can't deserialize into .NET List. You'll get this error: Cannot deserialize the current JSON object (e.g. {"name":"value"}) into type 'System.Collections.Generic.List`1[System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair`2[Sys‌​tem.String,System.String]]' –  shaqua471 Oct 9 '12 at 19:27
    
@shaqua471 Edit my answer. –  Sanja Melnichuk Oct 10 '12 at 6:39
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