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I'm trying to use position_dodge on ggplot to obtain boxplots of two different signals (ind) sharing the same categories (cat). When there is a category with data for one signal but not for the other one, the boxplot for the signal with data covers all the horizontal spacing, and does not respect the position_dodge instruction for that particular category. Is there a way to make ggplot to enforce the dodging rule? As you can see on the example below, the signal x has no data for category B, so it loses the space reserved by position_dodge. I would like to avoid that.

Thanks in advance.

data<-data.frame(cat=c('A','A','A','A','B','B','A','A','A','A','B','B'), 
                 values=c(3,2,1,4,NA,NA,4,5,6,7,8,9), 
                 ind=c('x','x','x','x','x','x','y','y','y','y','y','y'))

print(ggplot() +
        scale_colour_hue(guide='none') +
      geom_boxplot(
           aes(x=as.factor(cat), y=values, 
               fill=ind), 
           position=position_dodge(width=.60), 
           data=data,
           outlier.size = 1.2,
           na.rm=T))

graph with original problem

PROGRESS UPDATE

After some workarounds, I came up with the outcome I was looking for... (kind of)

data            <- data.frame(
cat=c('A','A','A','A','B','B','A','A','A','A','B','B','B'), 
values=c(3,2,1,4,NA,NA,4,5,6,7,8,9, 0), 
ind=c('x','x','x','x','x','x','y','y','y','y','y','y','x'))

p  <- ggplot() +
      scale_colour_hue(guide='none') +
      geom_boxplot(aes(x=as.factor(cat), y=values, fill=ind),
      position=position_dodge(width=.60), 
      data=data,
      outlier.size = 1.2,
      na.rm=T) +
      geom_line(aes(x=x, y=y), 
                data=data.frame(x=c(0,3),y=rep(0,2)), 
                size = 1, 
                col='white')
print(p)

solution with workaround

Some people remcomended using faceting for the effect I wanted. Faceting doesn't give me the effect I'm looking for. The final graph I was looking for is shown below:

final graph

If you notice, the white major tick mark at y = 10 is thicker than the other tick marks. This thicker line is the geom_line with size=1 that hides unwanted boxplots.

I wish we could combine different geom objects more seamlessly. I reported this as a bug on Hadley's github, but Hadley said this is how position_dodge behaves by design. I guess I'm using ggplot2 in a non-standard way and workarounds are the way to go on these kind of issues. Anyways, I hope this helps some of the R folks to push ggplot great functionality a little further.

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3 Answers 3

x of B has no values, so you can add "B", 0, "x" which essentially indicates that there is no distribution of "values" for x of B. The median and other percentiles are zero.

 data<-data.frame(cat=c('A','A','A','A','B','B','A','A','A','A','B','B','B'), 
             values=c(3,2,1,4,NA,NA,4,5,6,7,8,9,0), 
             ind=c('x','x','x','x','x','x','y','y','y','y','y','y','x'))

Also you do not have to add position parameters here, because when you consider x as a factor, ggplot -- geom_boxplot will automagically dodge to the sides.

print(ggplot() +
  scale_colour_hue(guide='none') +
  geom_boxplot(aes(x=as.factor(cat), y=values, fill=ind), 
  data=data,
  outlier.size = 1.2,
  na.rm=T))

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2  
This can be a bit misleading IMO. Ideal solution would have no boxplots or "lines" at zero. As it stands, to me this would say that x for B has values at 0, which is not the desired effect. –  Roman Luštrik Oct 10 '12 at 8:09
    
@RomanLuštrik: In that ideal situation, I would go with a box plot having no space allocated for "x of B" and this is what I do in my research. If I use values 0 for "x of B", then I would include a small description of what is the baseline value for values ~ factor(cat). It depends on how one interprets their results. OP was trying to use position_dodge parameters which in fact has been already implemented when the values of x are categorical. –  Sathish Oct 10 '12 at 15:32
    
Thanks for the feedback @Sathish! This is a great start. The dodge parameter is set to .6 so that related boxplots overlap enough to reflect their relationship, but not so much that data they will end up partially hiding data. I could live with dummy boxes for categories with no values, but maybe I need to make them transparent for the empty cases. I simplified the problem as much as possible before posting, but the original graph is a little more complex. It can include many more (50+) categories on the x axis. –  JAponte Oct 10 '12 at 18:20

I just got a clue to use faceting from one of the comments posted by Hadley at his git site, so credits goes to Hadley, the maintainer of ggplot2 package!

See if this is what you wanted. To learn more about options on setting the whiskers and others in this plot, check this help page in ggplot2 package:

?stat_boxplot

data<-data.frame(cat=c('A','A','A','A','B','B','A','A','A','A','B','B'), 
             values=c(3,2,1,4,NA,NA,4,5,6,7,8,9), 
             ind=c('x','x','x','x','x','x','y','y','y','y','y','y'))

p <- ggplot(data = data, aes(factor(cat), values))                     
p + stat_boxplot(geom="boxplot", position = "dodge", width = 0.60, na.rm = TRUE) +  facet_grid(.~ind)

enter image description here

To add colors to your plot, which in my opinion is a redundant one as you are already faceting the plot based on "ind" variable, try this:

p <- ggplot(data, aes(factor(cat), values, fill = ind))                     
p + stat_boxplot(geom="boxplot", position = "dodge", width = 0.60, na.rm = TRUE) + facet_grid(.~ind)

enter image description here

HTH!

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It just occurred to my mind that I should have suggested you to use faceting before instead of adding extra baseline data points to fill the missing values, and I remember well about faceting from Hadley's book on ggplot2. –  Sathish Oct 13 '12 at 0:09
    
Thanks for your help @sathish. I answered my own question, but I haven't accepted it yet because Hadley now thinks my workaround shouldn't be needed. He reopened the bug report I submitted a few days ago. I'm giving it another week to see if we get a definite solution. Thanks again! –  JAponte Oct 15 '12 at 15:19
    
Great! I didn't know you reported at GIT, anyways lets cross the finger and I hope someone will give you the required options in it. –  Sathish Oct 15 '12 at 23:48
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After some workarounds, I came up with the outcome I was looking for... (kind of)

data            <- data.frame(
cat=c('A','A','A','A','B','B','A','A','A','A','B','B','B'), 
values=c(3,2,1,4,NA,NA,4,5,6,7,8,9, 0), 
ind=c('x','x','x','x','x','x','y','y','y','y','y','y','x'))

p  <- ggplot() +
      scale_colour_hue(guide='none') +
      geom_boxplot(aes(x=as.factor(cat), y=values, fill=ind),
      position=position_dodge(width=.60), 
      data=data,
      outlier.size = 1.2,
      na.rm=T) +
      geom_line(aes(x=x, y=y), 
                data=data.frame(x=c(0,3),y=rep(0,2)), 
                size = 1, 
                col='white')
print(p)

solution with workaround

Some people recommended using faceting for the effect I wanted. Faceting doesn't give me the effect I'm looking for. The final graph I was looking for is shown below:

final graph

If you notice, the white major tick mark at y = 10 is thicker than the other tick marks. This thicker line is the geom_line with size=1 that hides unwanted boxplots.

I wish we could combine different geom objects more seamlessly. I reported this as a bug on Hadley's github, but Hadley said this is how position_dodge behaves by design. I guess I'm using ggplot2 in a non-standard way and workarounds are the way to go on these kind of issues. Anyways, I hope this helps some of the R folks to push ggplot great functionality a little further.

share|improve this answer

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