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I've below snippet of xml from my code base:

    <property name="myData">
        <map>
            <entry key="/mycompany/abc">
                <value>Mike</value>
            </entry>
            <entry key="/mycompany/pqr">
                <value>John</value>
            </entry>
            <entry key="/mycompany/xyz">
                <value>Sara</value>
            </entry>
        </map>
    </property>

The above snippet is just a portion of XML file. I've an existing shell script that replaces some of the data from the above file.

Now, I need to modify my existing shell script to comment the section as shown below:

            <!-- entry key="/mycompany/abc">
                <value>Mike</value>
            </entry>
            <entry key="/mycompany/pqr">
                <value>John</value>
            </entry -->

Is it possible to comment the above 2 entries to comment via shell script? I can replace any occurrence of with since I've only one such unique occurrence but I'm not able to replace </entry> closing tag if /mycompany/pqr node since all occurrences will get replaced if I try to replace it with </entry -->

Any idea on how to replace this closing node in shell script?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Use an xslt processor and stylesheet. Use a template match on all nodes that outputs the nodes as is - then create a second template that matches what you want to exclude that emits nothing. –  mythagel Oct 9 '12 at 22:12
    
xslt processor in shell script??? –  Mike Oct 9 '12 at 22:25
    
If you need a 'pure' shell script alternative I'd look at sed or awk. –  mythagel Oct 9 '12 at 22:34
    
I already have shell script & need an alternate with shell script only. Can any one provide an example on how to do this using sed or awk? –  Mike Oct 9 '12 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using an xslt stylesheet like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">

 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="no"/>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
      <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
      </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="/property/map/entry[@key='/mycompany/abc']"/>
    <xsl:template match="/property/map/entry[@key='/mycompany/pqr']"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Then using the xsltproc xsl processor via the shell script:

$ xsltproc fix.xslt document.xml

which will give you:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<property name="myData">
        <map>


            <entry key="/mycompany/xyz">
                <value>Sara</value>
            </entry>
        </map>
    </property>

If you really need those nodes commented out then my xslt-foo is not strong enough - you'll probably need <xsl:comment>.

EDIT: A solution with awk:

awk '/<entry key="\/mycompany\/(abc|pqr)">/,/<\/entry>/ {p=1}; /.*/{ if(p==0) {print;}; p=0 }' blah.xml

Result:

<property name="myData">
    <map>
        <entry key="/mycompany/xyz">
            <value>Sara</value>
        </entry>
    </map>
</property>

Please note that the awk version will not work correctly with nested tags.

-nick

share|improve this answer
    
Your awk script looks cool. I'll appreciate if you can explain your awk script especially flag p=1, etc. –  Mike Oct 10 '12 at 2:13
    
Sure, the first part matches a multiline pattern starting with the entry tag with mycompany key containing 'abc' or 'pqr'. The comma specifies that this is a range that is terminated with the close entry tag. When that pattern is matched it sets the variable 'p' to 1. The second part matches all strings and prints it out IFF p is zero (i.e. print it out if we did not match the previous pattern). After printing out the text it resets p to zero to continue with the next block of text. –  mythagel Oct 10 '12 at 2:20

Disclaimer: I think of using awk/sed/... for XML files as a bad idea; if the formatting changes, the line-number between your tags differ, you end up with a bung XML file.

    BEGIN{
      count=-6
    }
    {
      if( $0 !~ /\/mycompany\/pqr/ && NR != count+5){
            print $0
            next
        }
      if( $0 ~ /\/mycompany\/pqr/) {
        count=NR; 
        print gensub( /(entry)/, "!-- \\1", "1" )
      }else{
        print gensub( /(entry)/, "\\1 --", "1" ) 
      }
    }

Save as "something.awk", run like so:

awk -f something.awk your_file.xml
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