Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use Eclipse, so to me my use of //$FALL-THROUGH$ comments is common practice on switch statements and the like. But my coworker uses Netbeans and questioned what on earth I was doing with these. And trying to google anything with a symbol in it is like trying to pull teeth with a pair of frozen mittens and no tools...

Is the use of the //$FALL-THROUGH$ comment, dollar signs and all, a standard java thing, or some sort of Eclipse magic? If I load up the same code in Netbeans or another IDE, or run it through the standalone java compiler, will fall through switch statements still be marked with warnings, even with said comment or not? Is there a standard way to do this beyond using the @SupressWarning annotation (which would simply clutter code given how you have to use it)?

share|improve this question
    
can you give an example of what this comment does? –  RNJ Oct 9 '12 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Things like this are IDE/style-check-tool dependent. There are no "standard Java comments".

(Well, Javadocs are standard, but they don't control compilation/error reporting.)

An explanation of the $FALL-THROUGH$ construct is mentioned in eclipse release documentation:

The compiler problem for expected fall-throughs in switch case statements can now be suppressed by preceding the following case statement with a comment that starts with $FALL-THROUGH$. This is especially interesting for code that can't use the J2SE-5.0-style @SuppressWarnings("fallthrough") annotation.

Note that warning names for the @Suppresswarnings annotation are compiler dependent, and not a Java language standard.

share|improve this answer
    
I figured I would ask. Final answer: it is Eclipse magic then. Yay. :j –  Tustin2121 Oct 10 '12 at 14:05

I've seen other tools (e.g. FindBugs) that employ a similar commenting scheme. But nothing is standardised.

In most cases, these warnings are only thrown when the case statement contains code prior to the fall through. In most cases, you can avoid this by factoring out the common code.

For example this will not normally trigger a warning:

switch (foo) {
  case 1:
  case 2:
    doSomething();
    break;
  ...
}

But this would:

switch (foo) {
  case 1:
    doSomething();
  case 2:
    doSomethingElse();
    break;
  ...
}

I personally think the warnings are there for a reason. I consider it more readable (and safe) to refactor out common code and have no non-empty fall-throughs:

switch (foo) {
  case 1:
    doSomething();
    doSomethingElse();
    break;

  case 2:
    doSomethingElse();
    break;
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware what causes the fallthrough warning (in fact I turned the warning on myself, as it is off by default). Regardless, +1 for those who don't know what I'm talking about above. (Also, I much prefer using fallthroughs than cluttering my code with more methods, especially one that is used only once in one method.) –  Tustin2121 Oct 10 '12 at 14:08
    
It is a matter of taste, so I can't exactly declare you are wrong. I would just suggest you bear in mind that out of the many things programmers can do wrong, this was selected as something to warn about. The presence or absence of a break after a chunk of code in a case statement is quite difficult to grok when you are maintaining other people's code. –  Duncan Oct 10 '12 at 17:18
1  
In C# these kinds of fallthroughs aren't even allowed because it has a big potential for bugs (only multiple cases before any kind of statement) –  Mark Rotteveel May 31 '13 at 12:43

This comment is IDE specific and may fail with other ide and code checkers, although findbugs is smart enough to check comments with word fall in them. But, in any case you should not rely on comments to do more than direct the fellow programmer, you are just creating one more thing to maintain.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.