Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running gnu-parallel on a command that works fine when run from a bash shell but returns an error when parallel executes it with bash using the -c flag. I assume this has to do with the special globbing expression I'm using.

ls !(*site*).mol2

This returns successfully.

With the flag enabled the command fails

/bin/bash -c 'ls !(*site*).mol2'
/bin/bash: -c: line 0: syntax error near unexpected token `(' 

The manual only specifies that -c calls for bash to read the arguments for a string, am I missing something?

Edit: I should add I need this to run from a gnu-parallel string, so the end resultant command must be runnable by /bin/bash -c "Some Command"

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should try the following code :

bash <<EOF
shopt -s extglob
ls !(*site*).mol2
EOF

Explanation :

when you run bash -c, you create a subshell, and shopt settings are not inherited.

EDIT

If you really need a one liner :

bash -O extglob -c 'ls !(*site*).mol2'

See this thread

share|improve this answer
    
You may want to use a single-quoted here document separator bash <<'EOF' lest the calling shell interpolates some of the special characters. Or you could stick to your original bash -c approach and just add shopt -s extglob; before any commands. –  tripleee Oct 9 '12 at 20:45
    
Depends of the need of the OP, but I will add something for that –  sputnick Oct 9 '12 at 20:46
    
@sputnick That is definitely what I want but I don't know how to add arguments to Parallel's default calling command which is /bin/bash -c "" –  RussS Oct 9 '12 at 20:52
    
@triplee adding "shopt -s extglob;" works great, thanks! –  RussS Oct 9 '12 at 20:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.