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class A
{
    public:
        A():a(0)
        {}
        A(int x):a(x)
        {
            cout<<"convert"<<endl;
        }
        A(const A& rhs):a(rhs.a)
        {
            cout<<"copy: "<<a<<endl;
        }
        void print()
        {
            cout<<a<<endl;
        }
        void Set(int x)
        {
            a=x;

        }
    private:
        int a;
};

int main()
{
    vector<A>vec2(2,A(100));
    cout<<"the size: "<<vec2.size()<<"  the capacity: "<<vec2.capacity()<<endl;
    vec2.push_back(17);
    for(int i=0; i<vec2.capacity();i++)
    {
        vec2[i].print();
    }
    cout<<"the size: "<<vec2.size()<<"  the capacity: "<<vec2.capacity()<<endl;
}
convert
copy: 100
copy: 100
the size: 2  the capacity: 2
convert
copy: 17
copy: 100
copy: 100
100
100
17
0

why this happened

copy: 17
copy: 100
copy: 100     

it seems like the capacity is 5 not 4, and the capacity increased after the element i want to push pushed into the vector, i must be wrong, can someone tell me more details?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you understand the difference between size and capacity of a vector, you'll realise that when the capacity needs to be increased the whole vector needs to be moved elsewhere in memory.

The calls to the copy constructor occur when the vector elements get 'moved' from the old vector to the new one. If you add a destructor with some debug, it may make more sense to you.

Also...

for(int i=0; i<vec2.capacity();i++)

... is not a good idea. You're accessing beyond the end of the valid vector data.

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i add a destructor, after the vector grows, the destructor get called, and when the main function finished, the destructor get called again, and other question, the copy constructor copy the two elements when i initialized using the constructor, right? –  user1629199 Oct 9 '12 at 20:57
    
Yes, that sounds right. the elements can't just be 'moved' when the vector grows - new ones are copy constructed from the originals, and then the originals are destructed. –  Roddy Oct 10 '12 at 9:51

Right before the call to vec2.push_back(17) the size and capacity (as printed by your application) are both 2. At this point the 17 is converted to a A object which is then passed to the push_back function. Internally the std::vector grows the buffer to a larger capacity (which causes the two copies of A with value 100) and the argument to push_back is copied into the newly allocated buffer. In your implementation the newly inserted element is copied before the already existing elements.

Finally when you iterate from 0 to vec2.capacity() you are causing undefined behavior. You are only allowed to legally iterate the elements in the vector from 0 to vec2.size(). The output of your program indicate that in your implementation the buffer has grown to capacity()==4 (4 elements printed).

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You should not have a for loop using the capacity. Typically the capacity will double, this is to prevent memory trashing when inserting new elements.

If the initial capacity is 2, it will double to 4 when you add the 3rd element. When you add the 5th element, it's new capacity will be 8.

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Increasing of capacity is implementation detail. Not necessarily it doubles on every platform. –  Mahesh Oct 9 '12 at 20:46
    
True, I was just using that as an example to differentiate between Size and Capacity. –  Matthew Oct 9 '12 at 20:47
    
Typically the capacity will double is implementation dependent. In the standard library that ships with gcc the capacity doubles, but in Dinkumware (shipped with Visual Studio) the growth factor is 1.5. To comply with the standard, the growth factor need only be strictly greater than 1. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 9 '12 at 20:47

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