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I am searching for a guideline on how to name the assemblies with the numbers in it.

  1. For example msvcp100.dll or msvcp90.dll, why attach version numbers?
  2. How do they come up with these numbers? Are these applicable for .NET assemblies?
  3. Are there any solid guidelines by microsoft or someone on the naming convensions for files?

Datte.

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I can't answer any but #3. There is no guidelines for version numbers.. If you're under the illusion that they do have guidelines, just look at WinRT and .Net 4.5. They released significantly different assemblies with the same name, public key token, and version number. You have to take what they give you and hope that they stay semi-consistent. –  Earlz Oct 9 '12 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

The examples you gave with respect to msvcp are because they are major revision changes. Most likely, msvcp100's interface is not compatible with msvcp90's interface. The numbers come from the version of Visual Studio (msvcp100 for visual studio 10.0 aka VS2010, msvcp90 for visual studio 9.0 aka VS2008).

The general rule is that you add a number or make some difference in the name of the dll if you're breaking the interface. In .net this would mean removing public classes/interfaces, methods, and changing between fields and properties.

It should also be mentioned that because of "dll hell" the OS will handle a lot of the problem of multiple versions of dlls for you (without the need for numbering).

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For example msvcp100.dll or msvcp90.dll, why attach version numbers?

Consumer can immideately see the version of the binary he uses.

How do they come up with these numbers? Are these applicable for .NET assemblies?

The meaning of the numbers is up to the architect, dev team. For consumer it's enough to be informed that the version X resolves desirable issue (bug), or is compatible with something else. There is not any relation with .NET world here, these are just file names, so yes you can name your .NET assemblies in the same way.

Are there any solid guidelines by microsoft or someone on the naming convensions for files?

Nor that I'm aware of.

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