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enqueue_task_rt function in ./kernel/sched/rt.c is responsible for queuing the task to the run queue. enqueue_task_rt contains call to enqueue_rt_entity which calls dequeue_rt_stack. Most part of the code seems logical but I am a bit lost because of the function dequeue_rt_stack unable to understand what it does. Can somebody tell what is the logic that I am missing or suggest some good read.

Edit: The following is the code for dequeue_rt_stack function

     struct sched_rt_entity *back = NULL;
     /* macro for_each_sched_rt_entity defined as
     for(; rt_se; rt_se = rt_se->parent)*/
     for_each_sched_rt_entity(rt_se) {
             rt_se->back = back;
             back = rt_se;
     }

     for (rt_se = back; rt_se; rt_se = rt_se->back) {
             if (on_rt_rq(rt_se))
                     __dequeue_rt_entity(rt_se);
     }

More specifically, I do not understand why there is a need for this code:

     for_each_sched_rt_entity(rt_se) {
             rt_se->back = back;
             back = rt_se;
     }

What is its relevance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

When a task is to be added to some queue, it must first be removed from the queue that it currently is on, if any.

With the group scheduler, a task is always at the lowest level of the tree, and might have multiple ancestors:

       NULL
         ^
         |
+-----parent------+
|                 |
| top-level group |
|                 |
+-----------------+
         ^      ^_____________
         |                    \
+-----parent------+   +-----parent------+
|                 |   |                 |
| mid-level group |   |   other group   |  ...
|                 |   |                 |
+-----------------+   +-----------------+
         ^      ^_____________
         |                    \
+-----parent------+   +-----------------+
|                 |   |                 |
|      task       |   |   other task    |  ...
|                 |   |                 |
+-----------------+   +-----------------+

To remove the task from the tree, it must be removed from all groups' queues, and this must be done first at the top-level group (otherwise, the scheduler might try to run an already partially-removed task). Therefore, dequeue_rt_stack uses the back pointers to constructs a list in the opposite direction:

   NULL    back
     ^      |
     |      V
+-parent----------+
|                 |
| top-level group |
|                 |
+----------back---+
     ^      |   ^_____________
     |      V                 \
+-parent----------+   +-----parent------+
|                 |   |                 |
| mid-level group |   |   other group   |  ...
|                 |   |                 |
+----------back---+   +-----------------+
     ^      |   ^_____________
     |      V                 \
+-parent----------+   +-----------------+
|                 |   |                 |
|      task       |   |   other task    |  ...
|                 |   |                 |
+----------back---+   +-----------------+
            |
            V
           NULL

That back list can then be used to walk down the tree to remove the entities in the correct order.

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I am a fresh man in kernel hacking. This is my first time to answer linux kernel question. Maybe this help to you.

I read the source code. I think it maybe relates to group scheduling.

When kernel have these codes:

#ifdef CONFIG_RT_GROUP_SCHED

It represents that we can collect some schedule entities in to one schduling group.

static void enqueue_rt_entity(struct sched_rt_entity *rt_se, bool head)

{

    dequeue_rt_stack(rt_se);
    for_each_sched_rt_entity(rt_se)
          __enqueue_rt_entity(rt_se, head);

}

Function dequeue_rt_stack(rt_se) extracts all the scheduling entities belong to the group, then add them to run queue.

Hierarchical group I/O scheduling

CFS group scheduling

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I also think the same way but why there is a need to do the same, why first dequeue all and then en-queue again. –  Aman Deep Gautam Oct 10 '12 at 8:28
    
For example, if there is a little group of entities scheduling on the run queue. Then some events happend. A bigger group includes above group need to be scheduled on the run queue. Note that some entities in the bigger group may be not on the run queue. Remove the little group from rq ,then put the little group with other entities on the run queue at a time. Oh, I am sorry. I can't express more clearly. Maybe some fault in this explanations. Reading more source code will be good to find the answer. –  firo Oct 10 '12 at 13:54
    
Thanks for the help, it was definitely helpful. I will try to figure out more. –  Aman Deep Gautam Oct 10 '12 at 16:55

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