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I am trying to make a widget with a bunch of irregular shapes that all act as buttons. I need to both detect which region is pressed, and draw the "pressed" image for just that region.

My first tack was:

  • One image with everything unpressed
  • One image with everything pressed
  • Math to determine the region pressed
  • Constructing a path to use as a clipregion before calling pressedDrawable.draw(canvas)

This almost works, except it turns out that the shapes are not-quite-wedges of not-quite-an-ellipse, so everything is off by a few pixels here and there. That's fine for touch detection, since that's imprecise by nature, but it's not acceptable for drawing. After half a day adding and adjusting fudge factors just to get it to work on 2 devices, I decided that a different approach is needed.

What I'd like to do is this:

  • One image with everything unpressed
  • One image with everything pressed
  • One image with a different solid color for each "button", to use as a key

Then, detecting a button press is a simple matter of a pixel lookup on the 3rd image, and drawing the pressed button should be as simple as saying "draw pressedImage to canvas where keyImage == SOME_COLOR". However, I can't find any way to do this in Android. My vague memories of doing this in the past involve the terms "colorkey" and "ROP3". The closest I can find to any of this in the android docs is PorterDuff.Mode, but none of those modes seem to meet my needs.

Is it possible to do this in Android?

(I tried looking up the source of PorterDuffXferMode, to see if I could extend either it or its superclass, but there's hardly any -- the implementation is just a thin wrapper around native code, which I have yet to find.)

Also, I realize that I could probably explode the 3rd image out into a bunch of different images, an alpha-mask for each button, and that would work; but that solution seems less than optimal.

Edit: I tried using AvoidXfermode, but am not getting acceptable results. I have a key image with a couple of the keycolors very close, and some of the other quite a bit further away, for testing. I use AvoidXfermode.Mode.TARGET with a tolerance of 0 for drawing the subimage, then a tolerance of 255 for drawing everything else. It's drawing the "everything else" regardless of how far the key image is from the specified value, but it is blending the key and the background image even though I'm not explicitly asking for any blending and the images all have universal 255 alpha. (It actually seems like how much it is blending depends on how far the key image's color is from the target color, but that may just be an artifact of the values I'm using or a tired brain.) Sample code follows:

// Draw key
// Set avoid mode
// Draw foreground
// Set avoid mode
// Draw background

key.setBounds(0, 0, width, height);
key.draw(canvas);

Paint paint = new Paint();
AvoidXfermode avoid = new AvoidXfermode(0xFF1FFF01, 4, AvoidXfermode.Mode.TARGET);
paint.setXfermode(avoid);

foregroundDrawable.setBounds(0, 0, width, height);
Bitmap bitmap = ((BitmapDrawable)foregroundDrawable).getBitmap();
canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, paint);

avoid = new AvoidXfermode(0xFF20FF00, 255, AvoidXfermode.Mode.TARGET);
paint.setXfermode(avoid);

backgroundDrawable.setBounds(0, 0, width, height);
bitmap = ((BitmapDrawable)backgroundDrawable).getBitmap();
canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, paint);

(FYI, I used canvas.drawBitmap() with a fetch of the bitmap because the Xfermode is part of Paint, and AFAICT you can't use a Paint with drawable.draw(canvas).)

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