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I have the following method in which I'm using boost::variant. I try to get the value, based on type T. If boost::get<T> fails I want to handle that in a special way if T is an int or unsigned int. Is there any way to know if T is an int or unsigned int?

I don't think I can use template specialization in this case, can I?

EDIT: Also, I don't yet have access to C++11 (soon I hope)

template < typename T, typename C, void (C::*setterFcn)(const T&) >
void binder( const Variant& value_var, C* c )
{
    const T* typeData = boost::get<T>(&value_var);

    if ( NULL == typeData )
    {
        // Need to check for int or unsigned int here somehow
    }

    (((C*) c)->*(setterFcn))(*typeData);
}
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Something like std::is_same<T, int>::value? Or just specialize the whole thing for int. –  Kerrek SB Oct 9 '12 at 21:36
    
I don't believe I can do partial template specialization for this, can I? –  Nic Foster Oct 9 '12 at 21:51
    
@NicFoster : No, since one cannot partially specialize a function template. However, you could accomplish this easily with overloading. –  ildjarn Oct 9 '12 at 21:58
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++11 you can use std::is_same and in C++03 you can do something like this:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
class is_same
{
public: 
    static bool const value = false;
};

template <typename T>
class is_same<T, T>
{
public: 
    static bool const value = true;
};

and use it exactly as C++11 standard version.

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Griwes, thanks for the edit. I just went to the docs and wanted to update to exactly what you proposed. This way transition to C++11 would be painless. –  detunized Oct 9 '12 at 21:51
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The easiest way is probably to just delegate to overloaded functions or function templates: You specify the general handling, possibly doing nothing, in one function and the specialized handling either in two separate functions (if the extra handling is trivial) or in an enable_ifed function with the condition checking for int or unsigned int.

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