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I would like to save milions of locations into Cassandra's ColumnFamily and than make a range query on this data.

For example:

Attributes: LocationName, latitude, longitude Query: SELECT LocationName FROM ColumnFamily WHERE latitute> 10 AND latitude<20 AND longitude>30 AND longitude<40;

What structure and indexes shoul I use so the query will be efficient?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Depending on the granularity you need in your queries (and the variability of that granularity), one way to handle this would be to slice up your map into a grid, where all your locations belong inside a grid square with a defined lat/lon bounding box. You can then do your initial query for grid square IDs, followed by locations inside those squares, with a representation something like this:

GridSquareLat {
  key: [very_coarse_lat_value] {
    [square_lat_boundary]:[GridSquareIDList]
    [square_lat_boundary]:[GridSquareIDList]
  }
  ...
}

GridSquareLon {
  key: [very_coarse_lon_value] {
    [square_lon_boundary]:[GridSquareIDList]
    [square_lon_boundary]:[GridSquareIDList]
  }
  ...
}

Location {
  key: [locationID] {
    GridSquareID: [GridSquareID]  <-- put a secondary index on this col
    Lat: [exact_lat]
    Lon: [exact_lon]
    ...
  }
  ...
}

You can then give Cassandra the GridSquareLat/Lon keys representing the very coarse grain lat/lon values, along with a column slice range that will reduce the columns returned to only those squares within your boundaries. You'll get two lists, one of grid square IDs for lat and one for lon. The intersection of these lists will be the grid squares in your range.

To get the locations in these squares, query the Location CF, filtering on GridSquareID (using a secondary index, which will be efficient as long as your total grid square count is reasonable). You now have a reasonably sized list of locations with only a few very efficient queries, and you can easily reduce them to your exact list inside your application.

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I used something simillar. It's not exactly what I wanted but is ok – d.as Oct 16 '12 at 12:03

Let's pretend you are going to grow into the billions(and I will do the millions case later below). If you were using something like PlayOrm on cassandra(or you can do this yourself instead of using PlayOrm), you would need to partition by something. Let's say you choose to partition by longitude so that anything between >= 20 and < 30 is in partition 20 and between >= 30 and < 40 is in partition 30. Then in PlayOrm, you use it's scalable SQL to just write the same query you wrote but you need to query the proper partitions which in some cases would be multiple partitions unless you limit your result set size...

In PlayOrm, or in your data model, it would look like (no other tables needed)

Location {
  key: [locationID] {
    LonBottom: [partitionKey]
    Lat: [exact_lat] <- @NoSqlIndexed
    Lon: [exact_lon] <- @NoSqlIndexed
    ...
  }
  ...
}

That said, if you are in the millions, you would not need partitions so just remove the LonBottom column above and do no partitioning....of course, why use noSQL as millions is not that big and an RDBMS can easily handle millions.

If you want to do it yourself, in the millions case, there are two rows for Lat and Lon(wide row pattern) that hold the indexed values of lat and long to query. For billinos case, it would be two rows per partition as each partition gets it's own index as you don't want indices that are too large.

An indexing row is simple for you to create. It is simply rowkey="index name" and each column name is a compound name of longitude and row key to location. There is NO value for each column, just a compound name (so that each col name is unique).

so your row might look like

longindex = 32.rowkey1, 32.rowkey45, 32.rowkey56, 33.rowkey87, 33.rowkey89

where 32 and 33 are longitudes and the rowkeys are pointing to the locations.

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I presume PlayOrm isn't using secondaries on Lat/Lon, because they would be terribly inefficient with such high cardinality. What is the structure of the underlying indexes? – rs_atl Oct 10 '12 at 21:31

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