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I promise I've tried searching, but every single question I find ends up having some criteria unstated or violated that makes the answer insufficient for me.

I'm sending a list to a Python script. That list will be stored somewhere, but I want to minimize writes (this is on a remote service and I get charged for each write).

listNew = ["some", "list", "sent", "in", "that", "may", "be", "different", "later", "some"]
listPrevious = ["some", "some", "list", "that", "was", "saved", "previously"]

(Please don't get distracted by their being strings; my list actually contains ints.)

The simple, basic algorithm is to iterate both lists on an index-by-index basis. If the items are the same, I don't need to write; boom, money saved. The data ultimately saved, however, should be listNew.

In other languages, I could directly reference elements by index.

for (int i = 0; i < listNew.length; i++) {
    // Have we exceeded the previous list's length? Time to just write data in.
    if (listPrevious[i] == null)
        listPrevious.append(listNew[i]);
        continue;

    if (listNew[i] != listPrevious[i])
        listPrevious[i] = listNew[i]
}

Unfortunately, what I've found in looping techniques and list methods doesn't provide:

  1. the means to get elements by index without removing it (pop method), nor

  2. the means to get the index of an element by exact value and positioning, since I have duplicates (in the above code, using list.index("some") would return the first index in listPrevious though I'm actually looking at the last element in listNew), nor

  3. the means to iterate through my lists beyond the length of one of the lists (zip() doesn't iterate beyond the length of the smaller list, it seems).

Any ideas on how I should handle this? One of those three criteria were always violated in some way when I searched through previous questions.

I'm trying to avoid a solution like the following, by the way, which is also among the marked solutions in other questions.

for newitem in listNew
    for olditem in listPrevious
        if newitem != olditem
            # save the newitem

That compares the element from listNew with every single element in listPrevious, which is inefficient. I just need to know if it matches at the same index in the other list.

------- By Comment Request

Input: 2 lists, listNew and listPrevious. Another example

  • listNew = [100, 500, 200, 200, 100, 50, 700]
  • listPrevious = [100, 500, 200, 400, 400, 50]

Output: listPrevious is now listNew without having to overwrite elements that were the same.

listPrevious = [100, 500, 200, 200, 100, 50, 700]

  • did not require writes: [100, 500, 200, _, , 50, __] <- 4 writes saved

  • did require writes : [_, , __, 200, 100, __, 700] <- 3 writes executed, not .length writes executed!

share|improve this question
    
what's your expected output for the above lists? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 9 '12 at 22:17
    
I'm confused as to why you think you can't take your "other languages" code and use it for python... that should work just fine (obv using range instead of <length, but...) You can most certainly get elements in python lists by index w/o popping, using that exact syntax... –  Colleen Oct 9 '12 at 22:17
1  
Could you please add "input: (2 lists)" and "desired output: (??)" to your question? I'm a bit confused... –  Matthew Adams Oct 9 '12 at 22:18
    
@Colleen I can use that? Sweet! Thanks, I'll give it a shot and try to match my other-language code exactly. –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:19
    
@Ashwini Chaudhary: my expected output is for listNew to be saved into listPrevious, so listPrevious should show listNew's elements but without writing the elements that are the same -- in the example's case, the first "some" would not require a write. –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From you C code I have created the following. Hopefully it does what you want:

for i in range(len(listNew)):
    # Have we exceeded the previous list's length? Time to just write data in.
    if i >= len(listPrevious):
        listPrevious.append(listNew[i])
        continue

    if listNew[i] != listPrevious[i]:
        listPrevious[i] = listNew[i]
share|improve this answer
    
Adapting this for my code pretty much did it. Thanks! Also credit to @Colleen, who pretty much suggested this approach and made me inclined to see the parallel when you directly said "From your C code...". –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:38

If you want to iterate in order with indexes you need enumerate:

for idx, item in enumerate(mylist):
  # idx is the 0-indexed value where item resides in mylist.

If you want to iterate over pairs of things in python you use zip:

for a, b in zip(newlist, oldlist):
  # items a and b reside at the same index in their respective parent lists.

You can combine the approaches:

for idx, (a, b) in enumerate(zip(newlist, oldlist)):
  # here you have everything you probably need, based on what I can 
  # tell from your question.

Depending on your data sets, you may also look at the additional functions in the itertools module, specifically izip_longest.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll give it a try. In your personal opinion, is itertools good on performance and size? –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:28
2  
@Danny For all intents and purposes, the more objects you need to deal with, the better itertools gets. –  kreativitea Oct 9 '12 at 22:56
    
Fantastic to know. I'm only getting started with Python, due to my also-recent usage of Google App Engine. Thanks! –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 23:03

Python's list methods actually do provide all of the capabilities you think it doesn't (the last code sample is equivalent to your example code):

  1. the means to get elements by index without removing it (pop method)

    >>> data = ['a', 'b', 'c']
    >>> data[1]        # accessing an element by index
    'b'
    
  2. the means to get the index of an element by exact value and positioning, since I have duplicates (in the above code, using list.index("some") would return the first index in listPrevious though I'm actually looking at the last element in listNew)

    >>> data = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'b', 'a']
    >>> data.index('a')     # without a start arg, call finds the first index
    0
    >>> data.index('a', 1)  # you can find later indices by giving a start index
    4
    
  3. the means to iterate through my lists beyond the length of one of the lists (zip() doesn't iterate beyond the length of the smaller list, it seems).

    for i, item in enumerate(listNew):    # loops over indices and values
        if i >= len(listPrevious):
            listPrevious.append(item)
            continue
    
        if item != listPrevious[i]:
            listPrevious[i] = item
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clarifying that the "by index without removing" is possible, by index. Having the syntax and explanation here is useful, so have an upvote! –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:39

Is the item's position important?

If not simply do this::

for n in NewList:
    if n not in OldList:
        OldList.append(n)
        process(n)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the item's position is important. Thanks! I'll reformat the question to denote that. –  Danny Oct 9 '12 at 22:27

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