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I get a runtime exception when I execute the following code. I cannot see what is wrong.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.PrintWriter;

public class FileIO {

    public static void main(String[] args){

        File test = new File("test.txt");

        FileOutputStream ostream = new FileOutputStream(test); 

        PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(ostream);
    }
}

I keep getting a FileNotFoundException. I have tried keeping the file in every possible folder within the project and also tried giving an explicit path, but I keep getting the same exception. Any ideas?

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2  
did this compile even? –  MikeB Oct 9 '12 at 22:42
    
Do you see any difference between compilation time and execution time? –  Jagger Oct 9 '12 at 22:48
    
@Jagger: File has all permissions enabled for all users. –  Jin Oct 9 '12 at 22:48
    
@Jin From which language are you coming from? You should learn about checked and unchecked exceptions in Java. –  Jagger Oct 9 '12 at 22:50
    
So...you were getting a compile time error and not a runtime exception? sigh... –  pankar Oct 9 '12 at 22:59

5 Answers 5

When I tried this, it didn't even compile. I had to say that the main throws FileNotFoundException

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;

public class FileIO 
{

    public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException
    {

        File test = new File("test.txt");

        FileOutputStream ostream = new FileOutputStream(test); 

        PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(ostream);            
    }
}

This worked just fine with no errors

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OK. This works. I hadn't read about throws keyword, so I had no idea. –  Jin Oct 9 '12 at 22:58
    
Makes sense. Glad I can help –  MikeB Oct 9 '12 at 22:59

The answer is undoubtedly that the current directory isn't what you think it is.

Add this line of code immediately after initializing the file variable:

System.out.println(test.getAbsolutePath());

The problem should be obvious.

Alternatively, specify an absolute path:

File test = new File("/mydir/test.txt");
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As I said in my post, I had tried giving an explicit path, but it did not work. I had created a text file by this name in every folder in the heirarchy. –  Jin Oct 9 '12 at 22:58

Most likely the file test.txt in your current directory is readonly and an attempt to open it for writing (by instantiating a class of type FileOutputStream) is prohibited.

Check the file's permissions or delete it and run your program again (after adding a try catch block for the unhandled FileNotFoundException exception thrown by FileOutputStream.

For instance:

    try {
        ostream = new FileOutputStream(test);
        PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(ostream); 
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }  
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Based on File class and FileOutputStream class, try this:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.PrintWriter;

public class FileIO {

    public static void main(String[] args){

        File test = new File("test.txt");

        if (test.exists()) {
            if (!test.isFile()) {
                System.out.println("File " + test.getAbsolutePath() + " is not a regular file!");
                System.exit(1);
            } else if (!test.canWrite()) {
                System.out.println("Can not write to file " + test.getAbsolutePath() + "!");
                System.exit(1);
            }
        } else {
            test.createNewFile();
        }

        FileOutputStream ostream = new FileOutputStream(test); 

        PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(ostream);
    }
}

This checks for the common error conditions.

  • file exists
  • file isn't a regular file
  • file cannot be written to
share|improve this answer
    
new FileOutputStream() already does all those tests, in the kernel, atomically, and provides a message in the exception that says what the problem is if any. Repeating all those tests adds zero value, and it introduces timing-window problems as well. You still have to catch FileNotFoundException: why write all the handling code twice? –  EJP Oct 10 '12 at 2:18
    
For a simple reason: The OP didn't know where his code was failing. I offered tests to catch the situations where the exception could have been thrown. I never recommended the above code for production code. –  Geoff Montee Oct 10 '12 at 2:22
    
Of course, if his code wasn't even compiling, then the file isn't the issue, and none of this matters. –  Geoff Montee Oct 10 '12 at 2:23
    
The text of the exception would have told him that, if there really had been an exception thrown , which there wasn't. –  EJP Oct 10 '12 at 2:23

I get a runtime exception when I execute the following code.

No you didn't. You got a compiler error message when you tried to compile it. The message told you that new FileOutputStream throws FileNotFoundException and your code doesn't catch it. So fix your code to do that, or have main() declared as 'throws FileNotFoundException'.

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