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It seems like every job posting I see any more, and most recruiters I talk to, insist that the only way I could qualify for the position posted is if I'm an "expert" programmer and designer. And when they say "programmer and designer" they seem to mean, designer, front-end developer and back-end programmer (and most seem to assume that also means sysadmin). So, what are your thoughts? Do these mythical master programming designers really exist or am I just being illogical in my confusion thinking that these guys actually expect to find some one who's an "expert" programmer and designer willing to work in a "senior" position for a barely livable salary.

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They exist, but I think a lot of employers aim really high when writing job postings. The best programmers and designers are like Bruce Lee - they don't use any one particular technique or tool. Instead, they are masters of their environment and use what is available to create what is needed. This is something that is very difficult for most people to achieve. –  Charlie Salts Aug 15 '09 at 2:27
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My favorite ads require you to have been using best practices in Java for five more years than it has existed. –  Nosredna Aug 15 '09 at 2:34
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Of course they exist. But they don't go through interviews in order to get hired - employers who expect "expert" positions to be filled through interviews are delusional. –  ChssPly76 Aug 15 '09 at 2:34
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I don't get the question. Yes, they exist. What's the point? What more do you want to know? What does it matter if they exist or don't exist? What are you going to do with this information? Why are you asking? –  S.Lott Aug 15 '09 at 2:44
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Lott he's trying to figure out how to deal with non-technical HR people who throw around terms that they shouldn't. I would hesitate to call myself an expert to a fellow developer, I'd call myself a "super-whiz-kid-guru-dba-designer" without even blinking if that's what HR wants to hear from me. –  Spencer Ruport Aug 15 '09 at 3:03

11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, "experts" do exist, and you might even be one in something. The problem is that you're talking to recruiters, and you need to understand their perspective.

Most recruiters don't know anything about tech jobs beyond the various in-vogue acronyms and buzzwords. The actual companies doing the hiring rarely have the same expectations. Not all recruiters are equal of course (if you find a good one, keep the relationship active!), but most of them are simply doing keyword matching between positions and candidates. And most of them will up-sell both the position being offered and the people they submit for it.

Take a close look at the job requirement; if you think you'd be a good fit and be able to do the job, then go ahead and tell the recruiter you're an "expert". For their purposes, and for their definition of the word, you probably are an expert.

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If they're looking for an "expert", and you clearly fit the job requirements otherwise, then you're clearly an "expert" - so go ahead and say so.

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Most good programmers are humble folk, and have a hard time being declared a "master" or "expert". So, don't be distraught because you don't think you're an "expert". If you're smart and get things done, go for it!

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Whenever I'm asked the "rate yourself on a scale of 1 to 10" question I always tell'em there's no such thing as a 10 and they seem to get confused. But I still maintain, when it comes to any skill, there's no such thing as a 10 and if anyone says they are a 10, don't even think about hiring them. –  Steven Surowiec Aug 15 '09 at 2:27
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I agree. I think of Socrates was alive today, he'd be an unemployed programmer. –  Aaron Daniels Aug 15 '09 at 2:30
    
I think you could say the same of Einstein. –  Todd Stout Aug 15 '09 at 2:45
    
I'm wrong, he would be working for Google. –  Todd Stout Aug 15 '09 at 2:46
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"Today Google announced it's latest project gRelativity which allows users to experience 32 hour days incrementing at .0007 seconds every minute for free!" –  Spencer Ruport Aug 15 '09 at 3:17

Somebody who, on a scale of 0 to 10, is 8+ at each of these skills (designer, front-end developer, back-end programmer, AND sysadmin) might conceivably exist, though I've never met one in 30 years of a career mostly spent moving among the upper reaches of most of these professions (not "designer" -- in the usual, graphical-rich sense of the word -- but, my wife's career is different enough from mine, that she's had Terry Winograd as a professor and advisor, so it's not as if I'm all that unfamiliar with those... I've also worked "side by side" with Jeffrey and Asa Raskin [we were consulting in different capacities for the same client], and on other occasions with students of E. Tufte...).

If some such "Renaissance Man [[or Woman]] of the 21st Century" exist, it would be peculiar indeed for him or her not to be a highly-paid consultant, entrepreneur, or startup co-founder... I guess some personality disorder or (temporary!-) dire financial need might possibly place such a paragon in the position of seeking employment, but we're piling improbability upon improbability here, in a tower reaching up to the stars...!-)

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that is very poetic :) ... "piling improbability upon improbability here, in a tower reaching up to the stars" –  Alex Baranosky Aug 15 '09 at 7:05

I sure hope so; otherwise I'm out of a job.

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Everyone is an expert until someone better comes along and rubs their nose in the dirt.

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A few things here.

  1. Recruiters typically aren't technically inclined. I'm not sure why programmers still haven't been put in charge of hiring their own colleagues. The same people who constantly say "Oh haha, I don't understand anything about all that computer stuff." still want to be in charge of it all. It's very weird. Anyway, just look at the job requirements and if you meet them call yourself "cream cheese" if that's what they want to hear.
  2. On wages, if you are a competent developer you should charge a decent rate. There are a lot of companies out there looking for real talent so if you can convince them you've got it they'll be willing to negotiate. I know of two companies right now that are actively looking for developers but can't seem to get any interviewees capable of performing basic algebra.
  3. You have to learn how to sell yourself to both types of people. Prepare completely different answers to the same interview questions depending on who you are talking to. HR people want to feel like you have work ethic, Tech people want to know about your abilities.
  4. Relax. In the midst of an economic recession you have a skill set that is still in very high demand and short supply. It won't always be this way so enjoy it while it lasts.
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Jack of all trades master of none?

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Sorry, but this little phrase is now, and always has been, wrong. In reality, in order to be a master at something you have to have a good grasp of the surrounding things. For example, to be a master programmer you would have strong skills in database, networking, and architecture. Along the way you will more than likely have picked up a good knowledge of UI layouts that work or don't work. –  Chris Lively Aug 15 '09 at 3:00
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The point is a "master" will, by definition, be a jack of all trades. –  Chris Lively Aug 15 '09 at 3:00

Everyone asks for the moon and takes the best that they can when it comes time to really fill the position. If you don't like the pay or description let them go. Otherwise you won't know what they really want until you interview.

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Anyone who has really good problem solving and CS skills can do all above mentioned things which make him (very rarely her) an 'expert' programmer.

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Managers say they want skills, but what they really want are results.

An "expert" is someone who consistently delivers above expectations. To that degree, it correlates with experience. But experience does not make one an expert.

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