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Let me get it out of the way first: I'm a bit of a git noob. Git is reporting to me a load of file modifications that I haven't made, so I suspect it's something to do with line endings? Anyway, I just want to get back to a clean working directory, exactly as it was after my last commit.

I have tried all the usual suspects to do this:

git reset --hard git commit -- . git stash git clean -fd

But no matter what I do, git status always shows the same files as having been modified. What can I do? I have uncommitted changes stashed in another branch so I don't want to just blast away everything, but rather just "roll back" my master branch (excuse if "roll back" isn't the correct git terminology).

Any help would be much appreciated.

EDIT: Output

$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   demo/index.html
#   modified:   demo/js/app.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/jquery.1.7.1.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/matchMedia.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/modernizr.js
#   modified:   demo/js/loadr.js
#   modified:   dist/enquire.js
#   modified:   src/include/intro.js
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

Then I try what is suggested and everything else I could find:

WickyNilliams at Nick MBA in ~/Repositories/enquire on master*
$ git checkout -- .
WickyNilliams at Nick MBA in ~/Repositories/enquire on master*
$ git reset --hard
HEAD is now at d70fee4 added meta tag to test demo on mobile #10
WickyNilliams at Nick MBA in ~/Repositories/enquire on master*
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   demo/index.html
#   modified:   demo/js/app.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/jquery.1.7.1.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/matchMedia.js
#   modified:   demo/js/libs/modernizr.js
#   modified:   demo/js/loadr.js
#   modified:   dist/enquire.js
#   modified:   src/include/intro.js
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

As you can see, no changes despite the rollback.

So then I followed advice and ran a diff ignoring all space, and as suspected it seems there's no differences when ignoring spaces - so i guess it was line endings! What can I do to fix this? I've set to autocrlf to true to no avail

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Have you tried asking git diff to find out what the modification is? –  Kevin Ballard Oct 9 '12 at 23:44
    
yeah i had done that, it's basically saying every line has changed which is why i thought something to do with line endings. Strange though that all my work is done on one OS on one computer so not sure how this may have happened –  WickyNilliams Oct 9 '12 at 23:52
    
Is this happening even before you open the files in a text editor after resetting? I once found that my IDE was "helpfully" changing line endings for me without my asking, due to some crazy Preference I had set months ago... –  Bob Gilmore Oct 10 '12 at 0:35
    
Can you post the relevant part of the git status output? –  F.X. Oct 10 '12 at 0:46
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2 Answers

Try the approach explained in the "Re-normalizing a repo" section of this github article after making sure your EOL settings have sensible values (for your OS and repo policy)

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If you want to just change a file back to the way it was after the last commit, just do a git checkout [file] to get a particular file. But a git reset --hard should have done that to the whole tree. If you think it's just the line-endings, do a git diff and then a git diff --ignore-all-space. If the first diff shows changes and the second one doesn't, then at least you know you have a line-ending problem, in which case you might want to look at this description of git and line endings.

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Thanks, ignoring space showed no diff in files, therefore must be line-endings. Will follow the github article. Was hoping to avoid a commit specifically for fixing line-endings, but guess I'll have to. –  WickyNilliams Oct 11 '12 at 18:52
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