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I wonder if there is something similar to, say:

>>> class A(object):
...     def swap(self):
...         self = 'I am swapped'
... 
>>> abc=A()
>>> abc
<__main__.A object at 0x028B6130>
>>> abc.swap
<bound method A.swap of <__main__.A object at 0x028B6130>>
>>> abc.swap()
>>> abc
<__main__.A object at 0x028B6130>
>>> type(abc)
<class '__main__.A'>

see, it's type is not str, but Class A.

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I'm pretty sure you can't do this (in almost any programming language). Not sure on the why though. –  maček Oct 10 '12 at 0:02
    
this is a pretty bad design pattern... one of those just because you can doesnt mean you should ... a better option would be looking into the factory design pattern –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 0:03
    
@macek it actually is possible ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 0:04
    
Just to be clear, you are talking about instance methods. –  gnibbler Oct 10 '12 at 0:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

this is a terrible idea ... I do not advocate ever doing this ... In fact you should avoid at all costs ... look at using a Factory design pattern instead ...

>>> class A:
...    def swap(self):
...      self.__class__ = B
...
>>> class B:
...   pass
...
>>> a = A()
>>> a.swap()
>>> a
<__main__.B instance at 0x02C43E18>
>>>
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2  
yuck! shoot a man and he's dead. teach a man to shoot himself, and you don't even need to go to jail! –  wim Oct 10 '12 at 0:14
    
I agree ... but it does answer the question ... and i put a pretty good disclaimer at the begining ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 2:47

You are confused - there is nothing special about rebinding the name by using self = 'I am swapped' here, you are just assigning self to a string object and it is acting as a local variable here. You are not mutating the parent object at all.

Here is the proof:

>>> class A(object):
...   def swap(self):
...     print id(self)
...     self = 'I am a different object now'
...     print id(self)
... 
>>> abc = A()
>>> id(abc)
139677585341456
>>> abc.swap()
139677585341456
139677585341296
>>> id(abc)
139677585341456

By the way, you don't even have to use the word self for the first argument of member functions. That is just a naming convention which python guys use, but it will work with other variable names too.

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self is a convention. An instance of a class is what is handed to its functions in the first argument and you could call it whatever you like and you can do whatever you like to the local namespace in your particular function. See:

>>> class A:
...     def f(hats):
...         print hats
... 
>>> a = A()
>>> a.f()
<__main__.A instance at 0x100466908>

So yes, you can manipulate self in a class method, but since self itself doesn't actually mean anything, there's no real point. You should(n't) do what Joran suggested.

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