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Having trouble getting the following code to work. Calling swapLevel() directly works fine, but the addEventListener() doesn't seem to be doing anything?

JavaScript:

<script>
function load() {
    var arr = document.getElementById('menu').getElementsByClassName('level');

    for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        arr[i].addEventListener('click', function(){swapLevel(i);}, false);
    }
    // automatically open the first level
    swapLevel(0);
}
document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', load, false);
</script> 

HTML:

<div id="menu"> 
<a href="#" class="level">Level One</a> 
<span class="hidden" id="0">
<p>Some options here</p> 
</span> 
<a href="#" class="level">Level Two</a> 
<span class="hidden" id="1">
<p>More options</p> 
</span> 
<a href="#" class="level">Level Three</a> 
<span class="hidden" id="2">
<p>Even more options</p> 
</span> 
</div>
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I would suggest not starting ids with a number since it's not valid HTML4 –  elclanrs Oct 10 '12 at 0:04
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You index is not what you think it is because the for loop has run to completion before the event handler is called so i is arr.length in all your event handlers. Instead, you need something like this to capture the index value in a closure so it is what you want it to be in each event handler. A function call creates a closure so this example uses a self-execution anonymous function to create the closure:

function load() {
    var arr = document.getElementById('menu').getElementsByClassName('level');

    for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        (function(index) {
           arr[i].addEventListener('click', function(){swapLevel(index);}, false);
        })(i);
    }
    // automatically open the first level
    swapLevel(0);
}
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You need to use a self-evaluating closure here to capture the value of i at each iteration of the loop, because otherwise you get the value of i after control has left the for loop: arr.length.

var i;
for (i = 0; i < arr.length; ++i) {
    arr[i].addEventListener('click', function (i) {
        return function () { swapLevel(i); };
    }(i));
}
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Each handler needs to reference a separate value to pass to swapLevel. To use variable scope for this purpose, you need to invoke a function, and build your handler inside that function.

function makeHandler(i) {
    return function(){swapLevel(i);}
}

for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
    arr[i].addEventListener('click', makeHandler(i), false);
}

Another solution is to simply put a property directly on the element.

for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
    arr[i].__i__ = i
    arr[i].addEventListener('click', function(){swapLevel(this.__i__);}, false);
}

This technique would actually let you reuse the handler as well.

function handleSwap() {
   swapLevel(this.__i__);
}

for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
    arr[i].__i__ = i
    arr[i].addEventListener('click', handleSwap, false);
}
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