Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This seems like it should be fairly straightforward, but I'm having trouble coming up with an elegant solution.

Let's use the example of a basic file system, comprised of two hibernate-annotated classes, File and Folder.

We'll abstract out the common properties of the two classes into a FileSystemObject interface:

public interface FileSystemObject {
    public String getName();
    public URI getWhere();
}

And the two classes:

File:

@Entity
@Table(name = "FILE")
public class File implements FileSystemObject, Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Id
    @Column(name = "FILE_ID")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private long id;

    @Column(name = "NAME", nullable = false)
    @Index(name = "FILE_NAME", columnNames={"NAME"})
    private String name;

    @Column(nullable = false)
    private URI where;

    public File() {}

    public File(String name, URI where) {
        this.name = name;
        this.where = where;
    }

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public URI getWhere() {
        return where;
    }

    public void setWhere(URI where) {
        this.where = where;
    }
}

Folder:

@Entity
@Table(name = "FOLDER")
public class Folder implements FileSystemObject, Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2L;

    @Id
    @Column(name = "FOLDER_ID")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private long id;

    @Column(name = "NAME", nullable = false)
    @Index(name = "FOLDER_NAME", columnNames={"NAME"})
    private String name;

    @Column(nullable = false)
    private URI where;

    @CollectionOfElements
    @JoinTable(name = "FOLDER_CONTENTS",
               joinColumns = @JoinColumn(name = "FOLDER_ID"))
    private List<FileSystemObject> contents;

    public Folder() {}

    public Folder(String name, URI where, List<FileSystemObject> contents) {
        this.name = name;
        this.where = where;
        this.contents = contents;
    }

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public URI getWhere() {
        return where;
    }

    public void setWhere(URI where) {
        this.where = where;
    }

    public List<FileSystemObject> getContents() {
        return contents;
    }

    public void setContents(List<FileSystemObject> contents) {
        this.contents = contents;
    }
}

Logically, the contents of a Folder could be File or Folder, so it makes sense for the contents List to be of type FileSystemObject.

Now, assuming everything is set up correctly within pom.xml, when I try to generate some schema:

mvn hibernate3:hbm2ddl

It throws the following error:

Failed to execute goal org.codehaus.mojo:hibernate3-maven-plugin:2.0:hbm2ddl (generate-ddl) on
project foo: Execution generate-ddl of goal org.codehaus.mojo:hibernate3-maven
plugin:2.0:hbm2ddl failed: Could not determine type for: com.foo.data.FileSystemObject, for
columns: [org.hibernate.mapping.Column(element)] -> [Help 1]

Hopefully someone can shed some light on this!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is possible for the type there to be an Interface, but it will not work the way you've configured your entities. In order for both Entity types to be combined in the same collection, they need to share a common supertype that is itself an Entity. (That is, you'd need something like FileSystemObject to be a common superclass they both inherit from, that defines ID at that level.)

The problem is, consider this query:

select c from Folder f, f.contents c where f.name = 'FOLDER' and c.id = 3;

If there are both a Folder and a File that have id 3, how is it supposed to know what you want? This is why they need to share a common superclass if they are to be in the same collection.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks for the speedy answer! I was trying to avoid using a FileSystemObject class, but I now see why it is needed for persistence. –  Liam Oct 10 '12 at 2:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.