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I am trying to wrangle some demo code that runs as a console application in Linux into a daemon.

The SDK is in c++, so I went looking for c++ code that does all the things a daemon needs to do, i.e. start, fork, detach, redirect std coms to syslog, handle signals, etc.

So I found this example:

// daemon.cpp
// ~~~~~~~~~~
//
// Copyright (c) 2003-2011 Christopher M. Kohlhoff (chris at kohlhoff dot com)
//
// Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. (See accompanying
// file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)
//

#include <boost/asio/io_service.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/ip/udp.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/signal_set.hpp>
#include <boost/array.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <syslog.h>
#include <unistd.h>

using boost::asio::ip::udp;

class udp_daytime_server
{
public:
  udp_daytime_server(boost::asio::io_service& io_service)
    : socket_(io_service, udp::endpoint(udp::v4(), 13))
  {
    start_receive();
  }

private:
  void start_receive()
  {
    socket_.async_receive_from(
        boost::asio::buffer(recv_buffer_), remote_endpoint_,
        boost::bind(&udp_daytime_server::handle_receive, this, _1));
  }

  void handle_receive(const boost::system::error_code& ec)
  {
    if (!ec || ec == boost::asio::error::message_size)
    {
      using namespace std; // For time_t, time and ctime;
      time_t now = time(0);
      std::string message = ctime(&now);

      boost::system::error_code ignored_ec;
      socket_.send_to(boost::asio::buffer(message),
          remote_endpoint_, 0, ignored_ec);
    }

    start_receive();
  }

  udp::socket socket_;
  udp::endpoint remote_endpoint_;
  boost::array<char, 1> recv_buffer_;
};

int main()
{
  try
  {
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

    // Initialise the server before becoming a daemon. If the process is
    // started from a shell, this means any errors will be reported back to the
    // user.
    udp_daytime_server server(io_service);

    // Register signal handlers so that the daemon may be shut down. You may
    // also want to register for other signals, such as SIGHUP to trigger a
    // re-read of a configuration file.
    boost::asio::signal_set signals(io_service, SIGINT, SIGTERM);
    signals.async_wait(
        boost::bind(&boost::asio::io_service::stop, &io_service));

    // Inform the io_service that we are about to become a daemon. The
    // io_service cleans up any internal resources, such as threads, that may
    // interfere with forking.
    io_service.notify_fork(boost::asio::io_service::fork_prepare);

    // Fork the process and have the parent exit. If the process was started
    // from a shell, this returns control to the user. Forking a new process is
    // also a prerequisite for the subsequent call to setsid().
    if (pid_t pid = fork())
    {
      if (pid > 0)
      {
        // We're in the parent process and need to exit.
        //
        // When the exit() function is used, the program terminates without
        // invoking local variables' destructors. Only global variables are
        // destroyed. As the io_service object is a local variable, this means
        // we do not have to call:
        //
        //   io_service.notify_fork(boost::asio::io_service::fork_parent);
        //
        // However, this line should be added before each call to exit() if
        // using a global io_service object. An additional call:
        //
        //   io_service.notify_fork(boost::asio::io_service::fork_prepare);
        //
        // should also precede the second fork().
        exit(0);
      }
      else
      {
        syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "First fork failed: %m");
        return 1;
      }
    }

    // Make the process a new session leader. This detaches it from the
    // terminal.
    setsid();

    // A process inherits its working directory from its parent. This could be
    // on a mounted filesystem, which means that the running daemon would
    // prevent this filesystem from being unmounted. Changing to the root
    // directory avoids this problem.
    chdir("/");

    // The file mode creation mask is also inherited from the parent process.
    // We don't want to restrict the permissions on files created by the
    // daemon, so the mask is cleared.
    umask(0);

    // A second fork ensures the process cannot acquire a controlling terminal.
    if (pid_t pid = fork())
    {
      if (pid > 0)
      {
        exit(0);
      }
      else
      {
        syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "Second fork failed: %m");
        return 1;
      }
    }

    // Close the standard streams. This decouples the daemon from the terminal
    // that started it.
    close(0);
    close(1);
    close(2);

    // We don't want the daemon to have any standard input.
    if (open("/dev/null", O_RDONLY) < 0)
    {
      syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "Unable to open /dev/null: %m");
      return 1;
    }

    // Send standard output to a log file.
    const char* output = "/tmp/asio.daemon.out";
    const int flags = O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_APPEND;
    const mode_t mode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH;
    if (open(output, flags, mode) < 0)
    {
      syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "Unable to open output file %s: %m", output);
      return 1;
    }

    // Also send standard error to the same log file.
    if (dup(1) < 0)
    {
      syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "Unable to dup output descriptor: %m");
      return 1;
    }

    // Inform the io_service that we have finished becoming a daemon. The
    // io_service uses this opportunity to create any internal file descriptors
    // that need to be private to the new process.
    io_service.notify_fork(boost::asio::io_service::fork_child);

    // The io_service can now be used normally.
    syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon started");
    io_service.run();
    syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon stopped");
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    syslog(LOG_ERR | LOG_USER, "Exception: %s", e.what());
    std::cerr << "Exception: " << e.what() << std::endl;
  }
}

In any case, I was wondering, is this a good choice for getting a minimal daemon up and running(replacing the udp server code and replacing with my own code), or should I look into another approach to getting daemon functionality.

I am also confused as to where I am supposed to start of my code since the final step in this example is to call io_service.run().

My code will have two threads, one to listen for a connection, and another to handle pending connections every 10 seconds->updates from the connecting clients do not have a time critical window for updates and can even occasionally be skipped.

Thank you.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are looking for a quick and easy implementation, then it may be a good idea. In the very least, it provides a higher-level way to handle signals, which can otherwise require a fairly detailed understanding of lower-level mechanisms to get correct. A quick implementation may look like the following:

void connection_thread_main( bool& running )
{
  while ( running )
    ...
}

int main()
{
  ...

  syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon started");
  // Create flag to indicate if daemon is running.  This is used as the
  // condition for which the thread's while loop continue.
  bool running = true;

  // Create threads.
  boost::thread_group threads;
  threads.create_thread( boost::bind( &connection_thread_main,
                                      boost::ref( running ) ) );
  threads.create_thread( boost::bind( &pending_thread_main,
                                      boost::ref( running ) ) );

  // This will block the main thread as long as there is work queued into the
  // service.  In this case, signals are being waited on asynchronously.
  io_service.run();

  // On SIGINT or SIGTERM, io_service.stop() is invoked, causing the main 
  // thread to return from io_service.run().

  // Set the running flag to false and wait on the other threads to finish.
  running = false;
  threads.join_all();

  syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon stopped");
}

There are a few points to consider:

  • Boost.Asio provides excellent higher-level network object types. It may be worth using them instead of having to deal with lower-level types and details.
  • Although asynchronous programming has an innate complexity to it, there may be performance gains with an asynchronous implementation. As supporting thread pools is fairly easy with Boost.Asio.
  • Boost.Asio makes the signal handling easy.
  • If you decide to not use Boost.Asio, the example is a great resource on how to daemonize a process.
  • In the quick implementation, I opted to make the solution as readable as possible. As such, the main thread is basically wasted, as it is only waiting for signals. Instead of having 3 threads, it is possible to place one of the thread's content into a loop in main, and periodically poll the io_service.

    syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon started");
    // Create flag to indicate if daemon is running.  This is used as the
    // condition for which the thread's while loop continue.
    bool running = true;
    
    // Create threads.
    boost::thread_group threads;
    threads.create_thread( boost::bind( &connection_thread_main,
                                        boost::ref( running ) ) );
    
    for ( ;; )
    {
      // Execute ready to run handlers, but do not block waiting for
      // outstanding handlers to become ready.  When SIGINT or SIGTERM are
      // received, the handler will be ready to run, and ran from the poll
      // call, causing the io_service to stop.
      io_service.poll();
    
      if ( io_service.stopped() ) break;
    
      ... // pending_thread_main's while body content
    }    
    
    // Set the running flag to false and wait on the other threads to finish.
    running = false;
    threads.join_all();
    
    syslog(LOG_INFO | LOG_USER, "Daemon stopped");
    
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. This looks good. I will try it out. –  bentaisan Oct 10 '12 at 21:17
    
+1 nice answer, @bentaisan please accept this answer if it solved your question. –  Sam Miller Oct 11 '12 at 22:22

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