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I just make a foo class to explain what I mean:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, fakevalue):
        self.fv = fakevalue

    @staticmethod
    def make_a_foo():
        return Foo(2)

    def try_change_foo_value(self):
        self = Foo.make_a_foo()
        print "in change function, self.fv:", self.fv

if(__name__ =='__main__'):
    foo_instance = Foo(1)
    print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv
    foo_instance.try_change_foo_value()
    print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv

I expect:

foo_instance.fv: 1
in change function, self.fv: 2
foo_instance.fv: 2

But the result is:

foo_instance.fv: 1
in change function, self.fv: 2
foo_instance.fv: 1

We can see the self value has already changed, but the instance value does not. Why? And how to solve this problem?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this case, self is a pointer to the caller instance. Though you change the pointer in try_change_foo_value, it is just like changing a parameter in a function: it has no effect outside the method.

To clarify this, you can consider

a.try_change_foo_value() as shorthand for Foo.try_change_foo_value(a). This should make it obvious that when you change self, you are changing a local variable, while a, the caller, remains unchanged.

To fix it, you should do

def try_change_foo_value(self):
    self.fv = 2

but as mgilson points out, it is more Pythonic to just say foo_instance.fv = 2.

If you want to actually change the value of foo_instance (rather than just fv), you should do that elsewhere, not in a method (which makes little conceptual sense).

share|improve this answer
    
Note that it's really not idiomatic in python to write a function which just changes the value of an attribute. Usually it is more clean to just change the attribute directly: instance.fv = 2 rather than instance.change_fv(2). – mgilson Oct 10 '12 at 2:08
    
@mgilson Thanks for pointing that out, you're absolutely right. I've updated to reflect. – Alex Churchill Oct 10 '12 at 2:10
    
thank you! I get it! – Yang Oct 10 '12 at 2:14

self is just a variable. For regular methods (e.g. not decorated with @staticmethod or @classmethod ...), the object that gets passed in is the instance. However, within the function, you can rebind self to whatever you want, but the changes won't be kept outside of the function because assignment just makes a new reference to the object on the right hand side -- and unless you return that reference or store it on some object with broader scope, it will go out of scope when the function ends never to be heard from again (since you no longer have a reference/handle to it).

Consider regular functions:

def foo(x):
    x = 2

a = 1
foo(a)
print a #prints 1, not 2

This is really no different.

share|improve this answer

You are changing the container "self" inside of the method try_change_foo_value. Remember that self is being passed in as a parameter which means that you can change the reference inside of the variable self; but you cannot change the reference that the caller passed to you. Think about in Java.

public void changeIt(Foo foo) {
    foo = new Foo(2);
}

if I call

Foo bar = new Foo(1);
.changeIt(bar);

I can expect bar to still be the "new Foo(1)."

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3  
"think about in Java" -- I'd rather not ;-) – mgilson Oct 10 '12 at 2:03

In try_change_foo_value, self starts out as the instance, but you change it on assignment. You can check this by printing the id of self.

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, fakevalue):
        self.fv = fakevalue

    @staticmethod
    def make_a_foo():
        return Foo(2)

    def try_change_foo_value(self):
        print 'Originally, id(self) = %s' % id(self)
        self = Foo.make_a_foo()
        print 'After assignment, id(self) = %s' % id(self)
        print "in change function, self.fv:", self.fv

if __name__ =='__main__':
    foo_instance = Foo(1)
    print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv
    foo_instance.try_change_foo_value()
    print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv

Note the ids.

foo_instance.fv: 1
Originally, id(self) = 4299779608
After assignment, id(self) = 4299779680
in change function, self.fv: 2
foo_instance.fv: 1
share|improve this answer

There is a very simple rule about assignment in Python. Assigning to a name in Python always just makes that name now refer to whatever object you just assigned to it. It never actually alters whatever object the name referred to before the assignment.

A simple consequence of this is that in the line self = Foo.make_a_foo(), it is completely irrelevant what self was before that. The fact that we're talking about classes and instances has no bearing on this. Whatever self was before, we now just have the name self referring to the new Foo object.

Remember, a name is just a handle that lets you get at an object. A given object can be referred to by 0, 1, or many names at any given moment in time. Assignment is an operation that affects names, not objects. There's no way you can alter an object by changing what names refer to it.

foo_instance = Foo(1)
print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv
foo_instance.try_change_foo_value()
print "foo_instance.fv:", foo_instance.fv

When the above calls foo_instance = Foo(1), it causes the name foo_instance to refer to a new object. When you call foo_instance.try_change_foo_value(), that same object gets given an additional name self within the scope of the method. When you change that name to refer to a new object, it has no effect on the original object, or on the name foo_instance which is still referring to that original object.

This is a very very good thing! Otherwise whenever you called a function and passed it some objects, all the assignments the function makes to its own local variables would be changing what your variables are referring to!

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