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I have the need to use offsetof from a template with a member selector. I've come up with a way, if you'll excuse the awkward syntax:

template <typename T,
          typename R,
          R T::*M
         >
constexpr std::size_t offset_of()
{
    return reinterpret_cast<std::size_t>(&(((T*)0)->*M));
};

Usage isn't perfect (annoying at best):

struct S
{
    int x;
    int y;
};

static_assert(offset_of<S, int, &S::x>() == 0, "");
static_assert(offset_of<S, int, &S::y>() == sizeof(int), "");

The non-constexpr form is easier to use:

template <typename T, typename R>
std::size_t offset_of(R T::*M)
{
    return reinterpret_cast<std::size_t>(&(((T*)0)->*M));
};

at the obvious disadvantage that it isn't done at compile-time (but easier to use):

int main()
{
    std::cout << offset_of(&S::x) << std::endl;
    std::cout << offset_of(&S::y) << std::endl;
}

What I'm looking for is syntax like the non-constexpr variety, but still fully compile-time; however, I can't come up with the syntax for it. I would also be happy with an offset_of<&S::x>::value (like the rest of the type traits), but can't figure out the syntax magic for it.

share|improve this question
    
I'm trying to figure out where in the standard that it says that this does what you expect it does. But I can't find it. – Nicol Bolas Oct 10 '12 at 4:31
3  
Whats wrong with the standard offsetof? – Joachim Pileborg Oct 10 '12 at 6:13
    
@NicolBolas I guess it doesn't. Shouldn't the dereference of a nullptr (and I think -> counts as dereference) be UB already? But then again, VC's version of the offsetof macro isn't any different. So in practice it's probably rather implementation defined than undefined. – Christian Rau Oct 10 '12 at 7:29
    
I thought a constexpr function isn't allowed to contain reinterpret_casts or pointer derefs and address operators? – Christian Rau Oct 10 '12 at 7:32
1  
@ChristianRau If the standard doesn't require implementations to document their support, the support isn't implementation-defined. In this case, if an implementation defines the behaviour (and I'm not saying VC does), it's simply a permitted extension. A valid consequence of undefined behaviour is doing exactly what you want. – hvd Oct 10 '12 at 7:52
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The following should work (credits go to the answer to this question for the idea):

#include <cstddef>

template <typename T, typename M> M get_member_type(M T::*);
template <typename T, typename M> T get_class_type(M T::*);

template <typename T,
          typename R,
          R T::*M
         >
constexpr std::size_t offset_of()
{
    return reinterpret_cast<std::size_t>(&(((T*)0)->*M));
}

#define OFFSET_OF(m) offset_of<decltype(get_class_type(m)), \ 
                     decltype(get_member_type(m)), m>()

struct S
{
    int x;
    int y;
};

static_assert(OFFSET_OF(&S::x) == 0, "");

Note that in gcc, the offsetof macro expands to a builtin extension which can be used at compile time (see below). Also, your code invokes UB, it dereferences a null pointer, so even if it might work in practice, there are no guarantees.

#define offsetof(TYPE, MEMBER) __builtin_offsetof (TYPE, MEMBER)

As pointed out by Luc Danton, constant expressions cannot involve a reinterpret_cast according to the C++11 standard although currently gcc accepts the code (see the bug report here). Also, I found defect report 1384 which talks about making the rules less strict, so this might change in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
"and whether the above invokes UB or not is up for debate" -- Do you mean the above invokes UB, doesn't invoke UB, or you don't care? – hvd Oct 10 '12 at 7:47
    
@hvd: I clarified my answer. – Jesse Good Oct 10 '12 at 7:57
    
Looks good to me, then. – hvd Oct 10 '12 at 8:05
1  
A constant expression cannot involve a reinterpret_cast (unless not evaluated). – Luc Danton Oct 10 '12 at 9:20
1  
@LucDanton: Thanks for the info. I also found a defect report 1384 that talks about loosening the restrictions about that. – Jesse Good Oct 10 '12 at 9:43

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