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How do I address unchecked cast warnings?

My program compiles and works correctly when I compile with -Xlint:unchecked, but I am looking for assistance to remove this warning. Any help is appreciated! Thank you

This is the warning:

java: warning: [unchecked] unchecked cast
found   : E
required: java.lang.Comparable<E>

                            ^

The code the gives the warning is:

public boolean contains(E obj) {

    Node<E> curr = head;

        while (curr != null) {
                return true;
            }

            curr = curr.next;
        }

        return false;
    }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Petr Abdulin, hims056, Jeremy J Starcher, ChrisF, epoch Oct 10 '12 at 10:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/509076/… –  Petr Abdulin Oct 10 '12 at 4:50
    
@PetrAbdulin in this case, it's not the same. This could end in a ClassCastException if the E class doesn't implement the Comparable<E> interface when calling the contains method. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 4:56
    
Please don't edit your question to delete all its content - even if it's been closed as a duplicate (which I don't agree with in this case, I think @LuiggiMendoza's answer is most likely the appropriate one) it should be left in situ so the answers that were written before the close still make sense. –  Ian Roberts Oct 10 '12 at 23:17

3 Answers 3

If you're assuming all your data in your class must implement the Comparable interface, then you should add it in the class declaration, or else you could get a ClassCastException when using this method in a class that doesn't implement this interface.

public class SomeClass<E extends Comparable<E>> {

    public boolean contains(E obj) {
        Node<E> curr = head;
        while (curr != null) {
        if (obj.compareTo(curr.data) == 0) {
                return true;
            }
            curr = curr.next;
        }
        return false;
    }

    //the rest of your implementation...
}
share|improve this answer

You should change the signature of contains method as follows to avoid any type-casting while invoking compareTo method on obj:

public <E extends Comparable<E>> boolean contains(E obj)
{
    return true;
}

This will also mandate any E passed to contains method to already implement Comparable interface.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this will work, since he appears to be implementing the List<E> interface, so he can't change the method signature. –  Alexis King Oct 10 '12 at 4:47
    
I couldn't figure out from the question that he is implementing List<E>? –  Vikdor Oct 10 '12 at 4:55
    
@JakeKing OP doesn't says that his class is implementing List interface. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 4:57
    
@Vikdor based in OP's actual code, the <E extends Comparable<E>> is clumsy, because the class has the <E> template. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 4:58
    
Eh, I suppose not. Fair enough. –  Alexis King Oct 10 '12 at 4:58

It would seem that this is a flawed implementation of a contains(...) method. Objects should not have to be comparable, they must only be equatable. Simply use equals(...) instead:

public boolean contains(E obj) {
    Node<E> curr = head;

    while (curr != null) {
        if (curr.data.equals(obj)) {
            return true;
        }
        curr = curr.next();
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't a good solution, it forces to the <E> class to implement the public boolean equals(Object o) method, maybe OP doesn't need this at all. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 4:59
    
@LuiggiMendoza Object contains a default implementation for equals(Object), which compares by reference (aka ==) by default. This will use that implementation unless a subclass overrides it. This is a better solution since it doesn't require unnecessary use of the Comparable interface and it uses a built-in method for all objects. –  Alexis King Oct 10 '12 at 5:01
    
Maybe OP classes don't implement the equals method, instead by looking his/her code the E class should implement the Comparable<E>. We should guide OP to the better solution, not to add restrictions like this to the actual code. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 5:03
    
@LuiggiMendoza A class that implements Comparable should implement equals(...), though not perhaps the other way around. If a comparable object doesn't implement equals I consider it a design flaw and illogical. –  Alexis King Oct 10 '12 at 5:07
    
It is strongly recommended, but not strictly required that (x.compareTo(y)==0) == (x.equals(y)), from Comparable<T>. It could be a flaw, or maybe not, but that's out of the scope of this question. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 5:10