Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a class State. For a Queue of State objects, I want to test whether the Queue already contains a State object of equal value. Two State objects, which each contain a 2D boolean array, are equal when all values of the arrays are equal and in the same order.

Here is my relevant code:

public class State {
   Boolean[,] grid = new Boolean[4,4];

   Public State(Boolean[,] passedGrid){ //Constructor
       grid = Array.Copy(passedGrid, grid, 16);
   }

   public bool Equals(State s2){ //Overloaded equals operator
         for (int x = 0; x < 4; x++){
                 for (int y = 0; y < 4; y++){
                      if (grid[x, y] != s2.grid[x, y]){
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return true;
            }

}

    public void testContains(Boolean[] testArray) {
        Queue<State> testQueue = new Queue<State>();
        State s1 = new State(testArray);
        State s2 = new State(testArray);
        testQueue.Enqueue(s1);
        Boolean b = testQueue.Contains(s2);
    }

Unfortunately, when testContains() is called and I check the value of testQueue.Contains(s2) at the end, it still says the test is false, even though they have identical array values and the Equals operator was overloaded to test for that. What do I have to do or change to get Queue.Contains to work with my object? I read somewhere that getHashCode() is recommended to be overloaded whenever Equals is overloaded. Do I need to do that in this case? If so, what should the overloaded getHashCode() do?

share|improve this question
1  
Your Equals method is not overriding the base class implementation instead a new method is being created. Try adding the override keyword to the Equals method and then see if it works or not. –  jags Oct 10 '12 at 5:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To override Equals, you need to use object as the parameter type and the keyword override.

so you can try something like

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as State);
    }
    public bool Equals(State s2)
    { //Overloaded equals operator 
        for (int x = 0; x < 4; x++)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < 4; y++)
            {
                if (grid[x, y] != s2.grid[x, y])
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

You should probably also include test for null

Have a look at Guidelines for Overloading Equals() and Operator == (C# Programming Guide)

share|improve this answer
    
obj as State might return null. –  Sean U Oct 10 '12 at 5:33
    
@SeanU, added that to the anser that the OP should check for that. –  astander Oct 10 '12 at 5:36

For a class type to define a custom equality relation, the following should apply:

  1. The class should be immutable, and must not encapsulate mutable state. It is acceptable for an immutable class to hold references to mutable objects if and only if such references are used only to encapsulate the *identities* of such objects or immutable attributes thereof.
  2. The class must override `bool Equals(Object Other)` so as to return `true` when `Other` is an equivalent instance of the class (an instance is equivalent to itself; for mutable types, an instance is the *only* thing that's equivalent to itself).
  3. The class must override `int GetHashCode()` such that any two equivalent instances will return the same value, and preferably so that two arbitrarily-selected non-equivalent instances will be unlikely to return the same value.
  4. If the class is sealed, it may implement `IEquatable` for its own type in addition to doing the above. Unsealed classes should not implement `IEquatable`.

With regard to your particular class, I would suggest that since there are only 65,536 possible distinct instances, you should simply store an Integer which identifies which combination of bits is used, compare that in Equals, and return it for GetHashCode.

share|improve this answer

Please find below code which will work for you just fine:

    public class State : Object {
   Boolean[,] grid = new Boolean[4,4];

   public State(Boolean[,] passedGrid){ //Constructor
       Array.Copy(passedGrid, grid, 16);
   }

   public override bool Equals(Object s2){ //Overloaded equals operator
         for (int x = 0; x < 4; x++){
                 for (int y = 0; y < 4; y++){
                      if (grid[x, y] != ((State)s2).grid[x, y]){
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return true;
            }

}


    class Program
    {
        Boolean[,] testArray = new Boolean[4, 4];

        public static void Main()
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            p.testContains(p.testArray);
        }

        public void testContains(Boolean[,] testArray)
        {
            Queue<State> testQueue = new Queue<State>();
            State s1 = new State(testArray);
            State s2 = new State(testArray);
            testQueue.Enqueue(s1);
            Boolean b = testQueue.Contains(s2);
            //b is true here
        }

    }
}

Also, please look into below link to get guidelines for overriding Equals method:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147(v=vs.80).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Code which overrides Equals(Object) should also override GetHashCode(). –  supercat Oct 10 '12 at 23:49

You simply need to override virtual method defined on class Object:

public override Equals(object other)
{
   if(other is State)
        return Equals((State)other); 
   return base.Equals(other);
}

You need to use this generic overload because this method is used by Contains method and simply adding instance method with the same name is not enough.

share|improve this answer

You are missing override keyword

   public override bool Equals(Object obj) {
       // fill in the body
    }
share|improve this answer
    
When I did this, I get the error "no suitable method found to override" –  A_Obregon Oct 10 '12 at 5:42
    
This cannot happen as all classes by default inherit object class anyway try to inherit object class explicitly. –  Mahmoud Fayez Oct 10 '12 at 5:45
    
Also make sure to copy my code exactly and fill in the body please. –  Mahmoud Fayez Oct 10 '12 at 5:46

You should override Equals.

public override bool Equals(object s2)
{
    //implementation
}

For better practice, you should implement some other interfaces like: IEquatable IEqualtable<State> and the method GetHashCode. The override Equals method and the Equals methods in IEquatable IEqualtable<T> can share a common private Equals method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.