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I need to create an element repository for my app.

This is the class I created.

public class Elements
{
  public enum Type1
  {
    A    ("text1"),
    B    ("text2"),
    C    ("text3"),
    D    ("text4"),
    E    ("text5");

    private String identifier;

    Type1(String identifier)
    {
      this.identifier = identifier;
    }

    getPath()
    {
      String path = "";
      //do something
      return path;
    }
  }
}

Now I can access the values using Elements.type1.A.getPath();

I did a static import of Elements.type1 and I want to remove the usage of getPath() because it would complicate my code. ie. I need to be able to use type1.A.

So I did,

public class Elements
{
  public enum Type1
  {
    A
      {
        public String toString()
        {
          return getPath("text1");
        }
      },
    B
      {
        public String toString()
        {
          return getPath("text2");
        }
      },
    C
      {
        public String toString()
        {
          return getPath("text3");
        }
      };

    Type1() {}
  }
}

Now I can use Elements.Type1.A with print statements but I have a method which accepts String as parameter.

So that makes it Elements.Type1.A.toString(). Without toString(), it throws an error.

Is there a method to get rid of toString()?

Edit : New Code

public Interface Type1 
{
   String A = "text1";
   String B = "text2";
   String C = "text3"; 
}
public class Utility 
{
   public static void main(String[] args) 
   {
     getPath(Type1.A); 
   }
   public static void getPath(String arg) 
   { 
    //Constructs xpath - text1 changes to //*[contains(@class,'text1')] 
    return xpath; 
   } 
} 
public class myClass 
{
   public void doSomething() 
   {
     assertEquals(Type1.A,xpath); 
   } 
}

Here, Type1.A returns "text1" and not //*[contains(@class,'text1')]

share|improve this question
1  
The only reason you can avoid using toString() normally is because + and System.out/System.err knows how to do it under the covers. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 10 '12 at 5:52
    
First don't use toString to return something other than just 'String representation of the object'. How do client of this class know that this is actually some 'path'? And for your question, you can overload your method to take enum param, extract necessary property from it and pass it to original method. –  Zvezdochet Oct 10 '12 at 6:10
    
Sorry that was my mistake. Edited the code. –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 6:12
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It appears you need three String constants not enums.

public static final String A = "test1";
public static final String B = "test2";
public static final String C = "test3";

Using an interface is not always best, but without further context I can't suggest something better

public interface Type1 {
    String A = "test1";
    String B = "test2";
    String C = "test3";
}
share|improve this answer
    
but I need to do some operation on the value before returning it. Is that possible? –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 5:56
    
Also, I need to use Type1 to denote A belongs to Type1 –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 6:03
1  
@Aswathi.. Dump them into an interface named Type1.. That's all you need.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 6:09
    
The idea of declaring them as string variables helped. I am accepting this answer because the discussion started from here. Thanks @RohitJain. –  1234 Oct 12 '12 at 8:10
    
@Aswathi. You're welcome. And its absolutely no problem. You should only accept the answer that suits your need. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 12 '12 at 8:11
add comment

Well, as Peter said, you need final static variables here..

Looks, like you want a set of String Constants to work with.. Then definitely you should work with what Peter has quoted..

Just to extends what he said, you can create an Interface, and have all your String Constants in it.. Then you can easily access them through Interface name..

public Interface Type1 {
    String A = "text1";
    String B = "text2";
    String C = "text3";
}

And somewhere in your other class: -

public class Utility {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // You can pass your String to any method..
        String a = Type1.A;

        getPath(a);
        getPath(Type1.B);          

    }

    // This method is not doing work according to its name..
    // I have just taken an example, you can use this method to do what you want.
    public static void getPath(String arg) {
        // You can process your string here.
        arg = arg + "Hello";
    }
}

You can also change what your toString() returns based on your needs..

And follow Java Naming Convention.. Enums, Classes start with Uppercase letters..

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, have edited the code to follow Naming Convention. –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 6:08
    
It is not possible to create an object of Type1 for each value in the enum since there would be 100s of them. –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 6:10
    
@Aswathi.. What exactly you want to have. You need to be more specific.. As far as I can make out from your comment, you want a set of String constants?? Am I understand it right?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 10 '12 at 6:16
    
I need to create an element repository. The identifiers have to be stored somewhere and when a user accesses an element, the element identifier has to be processed using a method getPath() and the resulting xpath needs to be returned. I want the element access to be as simple as possible; maybe like Type1.btnSave. btnSave will have different identifier depending on the Type. –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 6:33
    
But as I mentioned earlier, since there would be 100s of strings in the interface, it is not possible to declare a variable for each of them. Is there an alternate solution? Am really sorry if am being stupid. –  1234 Oct 10 '12 at 7:02
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