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okay so I have this code that converts infix expressions to postfix expressions. It works! Except I would like it to be able to handle errors such as "2+*5" or "wordswordswords". How would I do this? Thanks!

package InToPostfix;

import java.io.IOException;
import javax.script.*;


/** Translates an infix expression to a postfix expression.  
 * 
 * @author Becky Hogan
 *
 */


public class InToPost {
  private Stack theStack;

  private String input;

  private String output = "";

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String input = "";
    String output;
    Object evaluated;
    InToPost theTrans = new InToPost(input);
    output = theTrans.evalOp(); 
    InToPost result= new InToPost(input);
    evaluated= result.evaluate(input);
    System.out.println("Prefix is " + input + '\n');
    System.out.println("Postfix is " + output + '\n');
    System.out.println("The value:");
    System.out.println(evaluated);

  }

/** InToPost Method initiates the stack
 * 
 * @param in the expression string
 */

  public InToPost(String in) {
    input = in;
    int stackSize = input.length();
    theStack = new Stack(stackSize);
  }

  /** evaluate Method evaluates the mathematical expression
   * 
   * @param aString the expression string
   * @return an object obj, the answer
   * @throws Exception 
   */

  public Object evaluate(String aString) throws Exception {
    // create a script engine manager
    ScriptEngineManager factory = new ScriptEngineManager();
    // create a JavaScript engine
    ScriptEngine engine = factory.getEngineByName("JavaScript");
    // evaluate JavaScript code from String
    Object obj = engine.eval(aString);
    return(obj);
    }

  /** evalOp Method decides what to do with the indexed character depending on if it is an operand or operator
   * 
   * @return the postfix
   * @throws Exception
   */


  public String evalOp() throws Exception {
    for (int j = 0; j < input.length(); j++) {
      char ch = input.charAt(j);
      switch (ch) {
      case '+': 
      case '-':
        processOperator(ch, 1); 
        break; //   (precedence 1)
      case '*': // it's * or /
      case '/':
        processOperator(ch, 2); // go pop operators
        break; //   (precedence 2)
      case '(': // it's a left paren
        theStack.push(ch); // push it
        break;
      case ')': // it's a right paren
    gotParen(ch); // go pop operators
    break;
  default: // must be an operand
      if(!Character.isJavaIdentifierPart(ch) && !Character.isDigit(ch)){
          throw new Exception
            ("Unexpected Character Encountered");

      }
    output = output + ch; // write it to output
    break;
  }
}
while (!theStack.isEmpty()) {
  output = output + theStack.pop();

}
return output; // return postfix
  }

  /** Method to determine the precedence of operators.
   * 
   * @param opThis the character in the string
   * @param prec1 precedence of previous operator
   */

  public void processOperator(char opThis, int prec1) {
    while (!theStack.isEmpty()) {
      char opTop = theStack.pop();
      if (opTop == '(') {
        theStack.push(opTop);
        break;
      }// it's an operator
      else {// precedence of new op
        int prec2;
        if (opTop == '+' || opTop == '-')
          prec2 = 1;
        else
          prec2 = 2;
        if (prec2 < prec1) // if prec of new op less
        { //    than prec of old
          theStack.push(opTop); // save newly-popped op
          break;
        } else
          // prec of new not less
          output = output + opTop; // than prec of old
      }
}
theStack.push(opThis);
  }

  /** gotParen Method gets the previous operator
   * 
   * @param ch the character in the string
   */

  public void gotParen(char ch){ 
while (!theStack.isEmpty()) {
  char chx = theStack.pop();
  if (chx == '(') 
    break; 
  else
    output = output + chx; 
}
  }

/**Stack class holds attributes for the stack needed for this assignment
 * 
 * @author Becky Hogan
 *
 */
  class Stack {
private int maxSize;

private char[] stackArray;

private int top;

public Stack(int max) {
  maxSize = max;
  stackArray = new char[maxSize];
  top = -1;
}

public void push(char j) {
  stackArray[++top] = j;
}

public char pop() {
  return stackArray[top--];
}

public char peek() {
  return stackArray[top];
}

public boolean isEmpty() {
  return (top == -1);
}
  }

}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Michael Petrotta, Hardik Mishra, Kris, Nik Reiman, rckoenes Oct 15 '12 at 11:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What does it currently do on bad input data? –  nneonneo Oct 10 '12 at 6:33
    
How about using try catch instead of throws –  Hardik Mishra Oct 10 '12 at 6:39
    
on bad input data it crashes and the console is filled with errors –  Becksters Oct 10 '12 at 7:03

2 Answers 2

This needs to have a grammar parser rule. Write one according to this format:

EXPR: NUMBER OPERATOR NUMBER | NUMBER OPERATOR EXPR;
OPERATOR: '+' | '-'| '*' | '/';
NUMBER: [0-9]+

If it doesn't match the rule, then its a parse error.

sample code: (NOT TESTED):

class BadGrammarException extends Exception{

    /**
     * 
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = -2174692292489186639L;

}
class Validator{
   public boolean isValid(String s)
   {
       if(s.equals("+") || s.equals("-") || s.equals("*") || s.equals("/")){
           return true;
       }else{
       try{
           Integer.parseInt(s);
       }catch(Exception e){
           return false;
       }
       }
       return true;
   }
}

class GrammarValidator{
    private final int NUMBER = 0;
    private final int OPERATOR = 1;
    private int state = NUMBER;
    public boolean isValidGrammatically(String line) throws BadGrammarException{
        String[] tokens = line.split(" ");
        boolean flag = true;
        for(String p:tokens){
            if(new Validator().isValid(p)){
                /*everything is ok, token is valid*/
            }else{
                throw new BadGrammarException();
            }
        }
        for(String p:tokens){
            if(checkGrammar(p) == false){
                flag = false;
            }else{

            }
        }
        return flag;
    }

    public boolean checkGrammar(String p) throws BadGrammarException{
        if(state == NUMBER){
            /*expecting integer*/
            try{
                Integer.parseInt(p);
            }catch(Exception e){
                throw new BadGrammarException();
            }
            state = OPERATOR;
            return true;
        }
        if(state == OPERATOR){
            /*expecting operator*/
            if(p.equals("+") || p.equals("-") || p.equals("*") || p.equals("/")){
                       state = NUMBER;
                       return true;
                 }else{
                     throw new BadGrammarException();
                 }
        }/*unknown state*/
        return false;
    }
}

I tested the above code with :

public class Main{
    public static void main(String[] args){
       Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
       while(true){
       System.out.println("CHECK >");
       String line = scan.nextLine();
       try{
         if(new GrammarValidator().isValidGrammatically(line)){
            System.out.println("Valid");
         }
       }catch(BadGrammarException be){
           break;
       }
       }
    }
}

Looks like it gracefully exits on bad input. You can change the behavior though. After the input has been validated: you can convert from infix to postfix.

ONLY thing to note is, the input must separate NUMBERS and OPERATORS with a single (space) Example Valid Input: 10 + 20 + 30 + 40 + 50 - 30 - 20 Example INVALID input: 10+20+30+40+50-30-20

share|improve this answer
    
how do i do this? I don't know much about creating exceptions –  Becksters Oct 10 '12 at 6:41
    
@Becksters long story short: if you find something odd when reading the String (like wrong symbol or letters), then just throw an Exception. Prototype is just adding a kind of pattern to respect when reading (validating) the String, but you could have another one. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 6:47
    
To create an exception create a class that extends "Exception" class. And to write this grammar, just read up on recursive descent parsers. They're easy to implement. –  Aniket Oct 10 '12 at 6:48

You can enclose your potentially risky code in try-catch block.

try {
   InToPost theTrans = new InToPost(input);
   output = theTrans.evalOp(); 
   InToPost result= new InToPost(input);
   evaluated= result.evaluate(input);
} catch (Exception e) {
   System.out.println(e.getMessage());
}

And you can throw your exceptions when, for example, logic errors occur. Like you done here:

if(!Character.isJavaIdentifierPart(ch) && !Character.isDigit(ch)){
          throw new Exception
            ("Unexpected Character Encountered");

      }

Read more about handling exceptions

share|improve this answer
    
It would be better to throw the error in the method and catch it in the classes that use it. In this way, your method will be cleaner and let another layer to handle the error: logging, displaying a fancy window with a message, or whatever technique you use in your application. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 6:53
    
Do you advice whole InToPostfix.class redisign? –  Yegoshin Maxim Oct 10 '12 at 6:57
    
If you want a good, clean and maintainable code that shines when you just open the class, yes. Do not fear to do whatever it takes to sharp your code and enhance your abilities (at least that you're running out of time and you should present the first thing that just works, still IMO I disagree with this parenthesis part). –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 10 '12 at 7:01
    
In the way you think this question can be closed as duplicate of questions related to working with exceptions topic, can't it? The author wants basic exception handling in his class. As you see, in his implementation there is only one class. So should I also help him to get in touch with oop conceptions? Advice him how to write reusable code, how to encapsulate things etc? I think these things are beyond this question. Rewriting author's implementation as well. –  Yegoshin Maxim Oct 10 '12 at 7:08

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