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I essentially want to achieve this in C: echo 'some string' | foo where foo writes to file file1.txt. Running foo makes it block and wait for input from stdin, after which it writes to file1.txt. I am successfully sending data to foo through stdin but foo fails to open a local file when using C pipes.

Here's what I've done:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

int main() {

    FILE *stream;
    int fds[2];
    int status;
    pid_t pid;
    char *cmd[] = { "foo", NULL };

    pipe(fds);
    pid = fork();

    if (pid < 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Fork failed\n");
        return 1;
    }
    if (pid > 0) {
        // Parent process
        close(fds[0]);
        stream = fdopen(fds[1], "w");
        fprintf(stream, "some string\n");
        fflush(stream);
        close(fds[1]);
        waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
        if (WIFEXITED(status) == 0 || WEXITSTATUS(status) < 0)
            return 1;
    }
    else {
        // Child process
        close(fds[1]);
        dup2(fds[0], STDIN_FILENO);

        execv("foo", cmd);
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

Internally foo makes an fopen call to a local file and fails with error no 14: EFAULT. I've also tried doing this using just popen/pclose rather than fork/pipe/dup2/execv.

What can I do to make this work?

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If fopen is failing with EFAULT, can you shown the fopen code? Does it work without the pipe? Are you sure that the filename supplied to the fopen is valid? –  cdarke Oct 10 '12 at 7:49
    
The fopen code looks like fopen(file1_name, "w") which returns NULL. It works without the pipe. The filename supplied is valid. –  Maros Hluska Oct 10 '12 at 7:54
    
You can put the code including fopen into the code section marked Child process, if you don't want to show it separately –  anatolyg Oct 10 '12 at 8:06
    
The source code for foo is large and I shouldn't modify it. We should treat it as a library. –  Maros Hluska Oct 10 '12 at 8:13
1  
EFAULT merely indicates an invalid parameter passed to fopen()/fdopen() (which would be indicated by EINVAL), but rather indicates a locking issues. At least on Linux or POSIX confirming systems. –  alk Oct 10 '12 at 8:42
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4 Answers

Yuu may need to use execvp assuming foo is in PATH directory. Other than that, you may need to supply the full path in execv("/full/path/to/foo", cmd);

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I just tried both and no luck. –  Maros Hluska Oct 10 '12 at 8:00
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There is a race condition in the code. The parent process writes stuff to the pipe and closes it, while the child process reads from the pipe. This may not be the reason for the problems you encounter, but it's never a good thing.

Try eliminating the race:

    stream = fdopen(fds[1], "w");
    fprintf(stream, "some string\n");
    fflush(stream);
    waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
    close(fds[1]); // close it when the child process doesn't use it anymore

Note: you should use fclose instead of close, regardless of anything.

Edit: as others indicate, this answer is wrong; there is no race condition.

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Closing fds[1] after the child is done means we never send EOF through stdin to foo. The pipe needs to close so foo can continue executing and write to the file (where it fails because of the fopen call). –  Maros Hluska Oct 10 '12 at 8:29
    
This is not a race condition, it's fine to write stuff to a pipe and close the writing side of it. The reading end of the pipe will receive the data and EOF, regardless of when it starts reading from it. (and since there's a fork() call, close(fds[1]); is fine, the child still have a reference to the pipe) –  nos Oct 10 '12 at 9:20
1  
@Maros Hluska Does actually running echo 'some string' | foo work ? i.e. have you isolated the error to be in the posted code, and are sure the error is not in foo. Another note; you should close(fds[0]); in your child process right after dup2(fds[0], STDIN_FILENO); , otherwise you're left with 2 file descriptors referencing the reading end of the pipe. –  nos Oct 10 '12 at 9:29
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've gone through the code of foo and extracted the portions responsible for reading from stdin and writing to a file. You can view the files here: https://gist.github.com/3868421

I've confirmed that echo 'some string' | foo works and that running the pipedata program pipes data to foo and writes to a file.

Since everything is working fine with this example, the problem must lie somewhere else in the source code of foo.

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The stdlib functions popen/pclose are a MUCH easier way to do this sort of thing. They do all the pipe and child management for you. Your program becomes just:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    FILE *stream;
    if (!(stream = popen("./foo", "w"))) {
        fprintf(stderr, "popen failed\n");
        return 1;
    }
    fprintf(stream, "some string\n");
    fflush(stream);
    if (pclose(stream) < 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "pclose failed\n");
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it looks much cleaner this way. Both the popen/close and fork/pipe solutions were causing problems though. I've posted an answer saying I got it working though. –  Maros Hluska Oct 10 '12 at 23:43
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