Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the scenario. I have a winforms application which has an auto-update feature. This application contains a method which calculates the md5 checksum of the current (local) exe file and compares it with the md5 checksum of the (server) exe file to determine if there is any new updates on the server by comparing the hashes of the 2 files on local machine and the server.

Now this method works perfectly on some PCs that I have and when I run the application it gives same checksum hashes. The problem is on some other PCs I always get the auto-update message because I'm getting different MD5 hashes, Now after that the application starts the auto-update and re-downloads the file on my server, I get a new exe file with a totally different hashes. I'm really confused what is possibly can cause this? is it a problem from the C# downloading method? is it a problem from the md5 function it self? any inputs would be appreciated...

EDIT: a method to calculate md5 checksum

public static string GetMD5HashFromFile(string filename)
{
    using (var md5 = new MD5CryptoServiceProvider())
    {
        var buffer = md5.ComputeHash(File.ReadAllBytes(filename));
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < buffer.Length; i++)
        {
            sb.Append(buffer[i].ToString("x2"));
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
Show some code. –  Jon Oct 10 '12 at 7:50
2  
How about simply reading the file (or assembly) version of the executable and sending this to the server for comparison? –  Uwe Keim Oct 10 '12 at 7:58
4  
If you have the original executable and an executable the problem occurs at, you could simply do a byte-by-byte comparison of both to determine if the problem is MD5 calculation or the executable actually being different. –  C.Evenhuis Oct 10 '12 at 9:31
2  
@RobinVanPersi I understand. (I would simply check for the exact file size, but your requirements may be higher). You could also do Authenticode signing and check whether the signature is valid, I guess... –  Uwe Keim Oct 10 '12 at 9:35
1  
There is the risk that those computers infected with some malware that will infect your executable. –  Theraot Oct 10 '12 at 9:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.