Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the below code.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        int i = 0;

        if(i==0){
            Beer obj = new Beer();
        }
        else {
            Rum obj = new Rum();
        }
        System.out.println(obj.brand);  //doesn't work
    } }

class Drink {
} 
class Beer extends Drink{
    public String brand = "BeerBrand"; }

class Rum extends Drink{
    public String brand = "RumBrand"; }
  1. Is there an way to make the above work without using function overriding or dynamic class loading?
  2. All classes are dynamically loaded in JVM there is no static loading like in C. Is this correct?
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there an way to make the above work without using function overriding or dynamic class loading?

The only alternative is to use reflections, but fixing the design of the classes would be much simpler/better

All classes are dynamically loaded in JVM there is no static loading like in C. Is this correct?

Yes. They can be dynamically loaded more than once and even unloaded.


Using an object orientated approach would look like this.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String... args) {
        Drink drink;
        if (args.length == 0) {
            drink = new Beer();
        } else {
            drink = new Rum();
        }
        System.out.println(drink.getBrand());
    }
}

interface Drink {
    public String getBrand();
}

class Beer implements Drink {
    @Override
    public String getBrand() {
        return "BeerBrand"; 
    }
}

class Rum implements Drink {
    @Override
    public String getBrand() {
        return "RumBrand";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I was asked in an interview the difference between static class loading and dynamic class loading in java? :P –  user926857 Oct 10 '12 at 8:51
1  
These are misused terms for which there are answers like en.allexperts.com/q/Java-1046/2009/11/… In all cases the Java class is loaded dynamically, but the binding of the classes name is static (determined by the javac compile) or dynamic (determined at runtime) –  Peter Lawrey Oct 10 '12 at 8:57

Drink should be an abstract class and provide an abstract member getBrand() or similar, overridden by Beer and Rum.

Then you'd do something like:

Drink d = null;
if (...) {
   d = new Beer();
}

so you instantiate the reference appropriately. Because it's still of type Drink you can reference the brand. The Drink reference will let you access anything drink-able, and the implementation provides the specifics. Note that Drink is abstract, since you can't instantiate a Drink - you have to be more specific.

To answer your further questions, you could provide a base method and do something like:

if (this instanceof Beer) {
   ...
}

to avoid overriding. But why would you ?

To answer your second question, classes are dynamically loaded by the JVM upon reference. You can watch that occur by setting the -verbose flag on the JVM.

share|improve this answer

This code won't work because scope of 'obj' is only within if-else block. You need to declare it above if-else block of type Drink.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.